The Worst Sodas

Did You Know: Philadelphia is the first major U.S. city to pass a tax on soda—1.5 cents per ounce, which is about $1 more for a 2-liter, Other cities have imposed similar taxes, including Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, Seattle, and Boulder, CO. The truth is that you don’t need to live in these locations to pay the price of drinking soda.

Although we call them “beer bellies,” new science says we ought to call our bloated midsections what they really are: soda bellies. In a study of about 1,000 adults over the course of six years, people who drank soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages gained an extra 1.8 pounds of visceral fat—the fat that sits inside your gut, damaging your internal organs and pushing your belly out into a King of the Hill–style slouch. To put that in perspective, 1.8 pounds is about how much a fetus weighs at 24 weeks. This means you can go from your lean, slim self to looking like you’re in your second trimester just by drinking a daily soda, sweetened iced tea, or fruit punch. (Talk about a punch to the gut!) But instead of carrying a bundle of joy, you’re carrying a bundle of toxic fat; visceral fat has been shown to increase your risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among other ills.

Why is soda so good at making us who drink it look bad? It’s the sugar. The USDA issued new guidelines in early 2016, recommending no more than 180 sugar calories per day for women (and 200 for men). This is the equivalent of approximately 45 grams of sugar—an amount that many sodas and other sweetened beverages exceed in just one can. And if it’s not sugar, then it’s an artificial sweetener, which can be 180 times sweeter than sugar and just as damaging to your waistline.


 Regular Sodas

sodas

First, I put them by calories, carbs, and sugar. Then, I examined each can’s ingredients and gave demerits to sodas with more chemicals and additives than those that were nutritionally similar. Here are regular sodas ranked from worst-to-best. (Although, “best” still doesn’t mean healthy!)


Fanta Grape

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 180 calories, 48 g carbs, 48 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural Flavors, Tartaric Acid, Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Protect Taste), Citric Acid, Red 40, Blue 1

Liquefy a bag of Skittles and you’d still have to add 6 grams of sugar to equal the sweetness of this can of corn syrup, citric acid, and artificial colors. In fact, that bag of Skittles has the exact same ingredients, including Red 40, which Canadian researchers found to be contaminated with known carcinogens. Even without its unsettling origin story—the Coca-Cola company created Fanta to profit in Germany when Nazis forbade the importation of USA-made Coke—this would still be the absolute worst soda in America!


Stewart’s Wishniak Black Cherry

best soda stewarts black cherry

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 180 calories, 44 g carbs, 43 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, Cane Sugar, Citric Acid, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Sodium Benzoate, Caramel Color, Red 40, Blue 1

With more sugar than seven Chewy Chips Ahoy cookies, Stewart’s Black Cherry would be a “Not That!” because of the sweetness alone—it’s the most caloric on this list. And, like many of the soda on this list, it also contains caramel coloring. This additive wouldn’t be dangerous if you made it the old-fashioned way—with water and sugar, on top of a stove. But the food industry follows a different recipe: they treat sugar with ammonia, which can produce some nasty carcinogens. A Center for Science in the Public Interest report asserted that the high levels of caramel color found in soda account for roughly 15,000 cancers in the U.S. annually. Instead, keep the soda-sipping to a minimum.


Dr. Brown’s Black Cherry

dr browns black cherryNUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 180 calories, 45 g carbs, 45 g sugar

 

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Cherry And Other Natural Flavors, Citric Acid, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), and Artificial Color (Red 40)

With just two fewer grams of sugar than Stewart’s Black Cherry, Dr. Brown’s Black Cherry would horrify most doctors—and not just because of the sugar. Like Stewart’s—and many of the colored sodas here—this one has the artificial color Red 40, which is it ranks lower than our next entry, despite having less sugar.


A&W Cream Soda

best sodas aw cream soda

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 46 g carbs, 45 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Caramel Color, Citric Acid, Yucca Extract, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Caffeine

A&W traffics heavily in the nostalgia of the roadside restaurant—the company created the nation’s first chain of them in 1923. But their cream soda is a car crash of HFCS and artificial colors and flavors. This is not your grandparent’s soda, in the worst way possible.


Mug Cream Soda

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 180 calories, 47 g carbs, 47 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preserves Freshness), Citric Acid, Caramel Color, Calcium Disodium EDTA (to protect flavor)

Speaking of cream, you’d have to down 12 servings of Reddi-Wip to equal the calorie count of Mug Cream Soda (distributed by Pepsi)—and would still need to eat 12 Hershey’s Kisses on top of that to equal the sugar count. That sounds like an easy way to sip yourself to a fat belly!


A&W Root Beer

best sodas aw root beer

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 47 g carbs, 45 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup and/or Sugar, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Natural and Artificial Flavors

You gotta love that ingredients list: This American classic might have sugar and HFCS. Throw in two scoops of vanilla ice cream to make a Root Beer float and you have more than two days’ worth of sugar in one chilled mug.


Mountain Dew

best sodas mtn dew

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Concentrated Orange Juice, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor, Sodium Benzoate (Preserves Freshness), Caffeine, Sodium Citrate, Erythorbic Acid (Preserves Freshness), Gum Arabic, Calcium Disodium EDTA (To Protect Flavor), Brominated Vegetable Oil, Yellow 5

There’s flame retardant in your Mountain Dew. That soda with the lime-green hue (and other citrus-flavored bubbly pops) won’t keep your insides fireproof, but it does contain brominated vegetable oil, a patented flame retardant for plastics that have been banned in foods throughout Europe and in Japan. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, which acts as an emulsifier in citrus-flavored soda drinks, is found in about 10 percent of sodas sold in the U.S. “After a few extreme soda binges—not too far from what many gamers regularly consume—a few patients have needed medical attention for skin lesions, memory loss, and nerve disorders, all symptoms of overexposure to bromine,” according to an article in Scientific American.


Mountain Dew Code Red

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Orange Juice Concentrate, Citric Acid, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Sodium Benzoate, Natural Flavor, Caffeine, Sodium Citrate, Gum Arabic, Calcium Disodium EDTA, Red 40, Brominated Vegetable Oil, Yellow 5, Blue 1

As we said, Europe and Japan have already banned the flame retardant brominated vegetable oil (BVO) out of their bubbly beverages. Code Red! Dudes, to truly get a six-pack, don’t do the Dew.


Dr. Brown’s Cream Soda

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 180 calories, 44 g carbs, 44 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural And Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Citric Acid, Caramel Color

With more calories than a Mountain Dew (though with less artificial colors, thus its better ranking), this Cream would make even Prince blush.


Dr. Brown’s Root Beer

best sodas dr browns root beer

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 42 g carbs, 42 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Natural And Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Gum Acacia, Citric Acid, Caffeine Free

You know when you add some Mentos to a two-liter Diet Coke and the whole thing explodes? (Don’t try that at home.) That’s thanks to the Gum Acacia in the candy, which also in this soda—it’s a natural emulsifier. Despite its weird name, is probably this most natural ingredient in this sugar juice.


Surge

best sodas surge

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 172 calories, 46.5 g carbs, 42 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Maltodextrin, Citric Acid, Natural Flavors, Orange Juice Concentrate, Potassium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Potassium Citrate, Caffeine, Calcium Disodium Edta (To Protect Taste), Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Carob Bean Gum, Blue 1

It’s not uncommon for “sodium and potassium benzoate are added to some diet soft drinks and fruit drinks. Unfortunately—especially because Surge contains OJ—”they can form benzene, which is a carcinogen when combined with vitamin C, the ascorbic acid in juice or soda.


Mello-Yello

best sodas melo yello

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 47 g carbs, 47 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Concentrated Orange Juice, Citric Acid, Natural Flavors, Calcium Disodium Edta (To Protect Taste), Potassium Citrate, Caffeine, Yellow 5, Carob Bean Gum

This soda is sweetened with inflammatory HFCS which makes for a shocking sugar count. It’s also colored with Yellow 5, a food dye that’s been linked to hyperactivity in children. Luckily, this soda used to contain the preservative sodium benzoate, a potentially cancer-causing substance but has since been removed.


Sunkist

best sodas sunkist

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 170 calories, 44 g carbs, 43 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Modified Corn Starch, Natural Flavors, Caffeine, Ester Gum, Yellow 6, Red 40

What do you get when you combine carbonated water with High Fructose Corn Syrup and a host of hard-to-pronounce chemicals? This citrus-inspired sip. It gets its alluring orange color from Yellow 5 and Red 40. A Neurotherapeutics journal study linked Yellow 5 and Red 40 to hyperactivity in children.


Barq’s Root Beer

best sodas barqs

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 45 g carbs, 45 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Citric Acid, Caffeine, Artificial, And Natural Flavors

Acacia Barq’s Root Beer falls toward the middle of the pack regarding carbs, sugar and has a slightly less horrifying chemical profile than its competition. It’s better than A&W Root Beer but slightly worse than Mug.


Fanta Orange

best sodas fanta orange

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 45 g carbs, 44 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Natural Flavors, Modified Food Starch, Sodium Polyphosphates, Glycerol Ester Of Rosin, Yellow 6, Red 40

I don’t know about you, but after a long day of hard work and play, I like to sit back and relax and crack open a can of Glycerol Ester Of Rosin. The wood resin is added to many fruit sodas to help the fruit-flavored oils mix better with the water. While it’s not necessarily harmful, let us repeat: you’re drinking oil and water, sold to you by Coke.


Orange Crush

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 43 g carbs, 43 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Natural Flavors, Ester Gum, Yellow 6, Red 40

Orange Crush has the same nutritionals as the next soda, Mug’s Root Beer, but we’re docking it points for the Yellow 6, which, as I’ve said, is crushing stuff.


Mug’s Root Beer

best sodas mugs

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 43 g carbs, 43 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (preserves freshness), Citric Acid, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Modified Food Starch, Calcium Disodium EDTA (to protect flavor), Quillaia Extract

Quillaia extract? The best (and worst) part of researching these sodas in the Eat This, Not That! Food Lab is coming across the weird ingredients soda manufacturers (in this case, Pepsi) add to their concoctions. Quillaia is another tree bark, and it helps your root beer foam up. Be more scared of the sugar here—you’re basically drinking four root beer-flavored Dum Dums mixed with additives.


Wild Cherry Pepsi

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 42 g carbs, 42 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Sugar, Phosphoric Acid, Natural Flavor, Caffeine, Citric Acid

Nothing wild here—just the same ingredients as most sodas, and as much sugar as more than three cups of cherries (without containing any real cherries… SHOCKER)!


Crush Grapefruit

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 160 calories, 43 g carbs, 43 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Tartaric Acid, Citric Acid, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Acacia Gum, Red 40, Blue 1

Our childhood nostalgia is crushed: This kid-favorite brand has no actual grapefruit. On the bright side, it has no BVO.


Mist TWST (formerly Sierra Mist)

mist twist

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 150 calories, 39 g carbs, 39 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Clarified Lemon Juice Concentrate, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor, Potassium Sorbate and Potassium Benzoate (preserves freshness), Calcium Disodium EDTA (protect flavor)

When it was called Sierra Mist, it was sweetened with sugar and stevia. Now, after being rebranded to Mist TWST, this soda is sweetened with high fructose corn syrup with no natural sugar in sight. This tacked on an additional 30 calories and 10 grams of sugar—far from the pre beverage that we used to rank #1 on this list.


Stewart’s Root Beer

best sodas root beer

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 150 calories, 38 g carbs, 38 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, Cane Sugar, Caramel Color, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Citric Acid, Quillaia Extract, Gum Acacia, Yucca Extract

If you wouldn’t eat three and a half bowls of Apple Jacks then you should stay away from this root beer. That’s the sugar equivalent of what’s in a 12-ounce can.


Cherry Coca-Cola

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 150 calories, 42 g carbs, 42 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Phosphoric Acid, Natural Flavors, Caffeine

As we come near the top ten, you’ll notice the oils and artificial flavors disappearing and see some of the most popular sodas for what they really are: carbonated water, HFCS, some acids and little else. This classic—once made with real cherry juice—is, unfortunately, a variation on a common blend. It’s like finding out your cool dad worked in accounting all along.


Pepsi-Cola

best sodas pepsi

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 150 calories, 41 g carbs, 41 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Sugar, Phosphoric Acid, Caffeine, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor

The perennial #2 in the cola wars carries 5 grams more sugar than a 3 Musketeers bar and 1 gram more carbs. Let that sink in: One of America’s most popular sodas has that much sugar. Instead of drinking this, make a weight loss smoothie!


Pepsi Real Sugar

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 150 calories, 40 g carbs, 40 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, Sugar, Caramel Color, Phosphoric, Acid, Caffeine, Natural Flavor

Sugar is the master of disguise. Maltodextrin, brown rice syrup, dextrose, sucrose—it’s got more alter egos than the Avengers. But its most well-known costume, as you know after reading this far, is High Fructose Corn Syrup. Pepsi’s hoping you forget it’s all the same sweet stuff, heavily marketing this new brand formulated with sugar and no HFCS. But in a 2014 review of five studies comparing the effects of sugar and HFCS, there was no difference found in changes in blood glucose levels, lipid levels, or appetite between table sugar consumption and HFCS consumption. In other words, your body can’t tell one from the other—they’re both just sugar.


Pibb Xtra

best sodas

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 39 g carbs, 39 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Phosphoric Acid, Potassium Sorbate And Potassium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Artificial And Natural Flavors, Caffeine, Monosodium Phosphate, Lactic Acid, Polyethylene Glycol

A “spicy” cherry soda found mostly in the South—or in Coke Freestyle machines—Pibb Xtra contains propylene glycol, a preservative, thickening agent, and stabilizer, also used as antifreeze to de-ice airplanes, as a plasticizer to make polyester resins, and found in electronic cigarettes. The soda ranks well because of its calorie count, but we can’t recommend you drink it!


7Up Cherry

best sodas 7up cherry

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 39 g carbs, 38 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Citric Acid, Filtered Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural Flavors, Potassium Benzoate (preservative), Red 40

No caramel color—ranking goes up! Red 40—ranking goes down.


Coca-Cola Classic

best sodas coca cola

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 39 g carbs, 39 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Phosphoric Acid, Natural Flavors, Caffeine

The company itself is responsible for the HFCS-filled Sprite, Barq’s, Fanta, Dr. Pepper, Fuze Tea, Powerade, Monster energy drinks and more—not to mention the sugary VitaminWater. Yet the company’s flagship drink is less harmful than most of the soda’s on this list. That doesn’t mean you should drink it. It means you shouldn’t drink soda. For a healthier buzz without the preservatives, drink tea.


7Up

best sodas 7up

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 39 g carbs, 38 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Filtered Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Potassium Citrate, Natural Flavors, Calcium Disodium EDTA (to protect flavor)

The best part of clear sodas: no caramel color. Worst part: They’re still sodas, and otherwise contain the same ingredients as the rest. This classic, now distributed by the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, has lost market share since its 80s heyday but remains a crisp drink that’s not much better than a Coke.


Sprite

best sodas sprite

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 38 g carbs, 38 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Natural Flavors, Sodium Citrate, Sodium Benzoate (To Protect Taste)

Promoted by the coolest athletes, Sprite has the marketing down—and a calorie count slightly lower than the other citric sodas on this list. But we can’t imagine LeBron and friends guzzling a can of carbonated corn syrup before a game.


Canada Dry Ginger Ale

best sodas canada dry

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 36 g carbs, 35 g sugar

INGREDIENTS:*Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Natural Flavors, Caramel Color

Our moms used to give this to us when we had a tummy ache. Now as adults, we get a tummy ache looking at it. Blame Canada. Their tagline is “Real Ginger, Real Taste” but the main ingredients here are carbonated water and HSFC, which won’t help you lose your belly! But with lower calories than the rest, it ranks well on this ignominious list.


Dr. Brown’s Cel Ray

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 140 calories, 34 g carbs, 34 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Extract of Celery Seed with other Natural Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative) and Caramel Color

The healthiest-sounding soda on this list nearly is. But unfortunately for the fans of Jewish delis everywhere, Cel Ray blends actual celery seed extract with HFCS.


Schweppes Ginger Ale

best sodas schwepps

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 120 calories, 33 g carbs, 32 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Natural Flavors, Natural Colors

Despite being near the top of this list, this soda has as much HFCS-derived sugar as 10 croissants. At least there are any artificial flavors (nor ginger, unfortunately).


Seagram’s Ginger Ale

best sodas seagrams

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 100 calories, 26 g carbs, 26 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Natural Flavors, Potassium Sorbate (To Protect Taste), Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Ginger

This is the #2 least-worst soda, with a big caveat: “High fructose corn syrup, which has been shown to increase appetite and, over time, leads to health problems such as obesity and diabetes,” Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., founder of The NY Nutrition Group says. Yeah, yeah, you knew it was bad, but hear us again: HFCS is bad! Still, Seagram’s Ginger Ale has a lower calorie count than most.

And coming in at #1

Coca-Cola Life

coca-cola life

NUTRITION (PER 12 FL OZ): 90 calories, 24 g sugar

INGREDIENTS: Carbonated Water, Cane Sugar, Caramel Color, Natural Flavors, Phosphoric Acid, Potassium Benzoate (To Protect Taste), Caffeine, Stevia Leaf Extract

Although Coke Life is sweetened with stevia, it’s certainly not a “diet” beverage. A can of this still packs 24 grams of sugar and is 90 calories. Still, that’s much less than other traditional colas on the market. And the ingredients are pretty simple, too—sweetened with cane sugar and stevia, there’s no HFCS, which is a bonus. At less than 100 calories a can, this is definitely the best of the regular sodas (although it that still doesn’t make it healthy!)


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

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Why Too Much Sugar Is Bad for You

When it comes to sugar we are told it’s bad for us but yet here we are consuming more and more sugar. Today I discuss the nasty side of sugar and why it’s time for you to consider going totally sugar-free or the very least cutting back on your sugar intake.

From marinara sauce to peanut butter, added sugar can be found in even the most unexpected products.

Many people rely on quick, processed foods for meals and snacks. Since these products often contain added sugar, it makes up a large proportion of their daily calorie intake.

In the US, added sugars account for up to 17% of the total calorie intake of adults and up to 14% for children (total added sugar intakes).

Dietary guidelines suggest limiting calories from added sugar to less than 10% per day (What Are Added Sugars?).

Experts believe that sugar consumption is a major cause of obesity and many chronic diseases, such as diabetes.


Ways Sugar Can Cause Weight Gain

Too Much Sugar

Rates of obesity are rising worldwide and added sugar, especially from sugar-sweetened beverages, is thought to be one of the main culprits.

Sugar-sweetened drinks like sodas, juices and sweet teas are loaded with fructose, a type of simple sugar.

Consuming fructose increases your hunger and desire for food more than glucose, the main type of sugar found in starchy foods (Differential effects of fructose versus glucose).

Additionally, excessive fructose consumption may cause resistance to leptin, an important hormone that regulates hunger and tells your body to stop eating ( leptin resistance).

In other words, sugary beverages don’t curb your hunger, making it easy to quickly consume a high number of liquid calories. This can lead to weight gain.

Research has consistently shown that people who drink sugary beverages, such as soda and juice, weigh more than people who don’t (Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain).

Also, drinking a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages is linked to an increased amount of visceral fat, a kind of deep belly fat associated with conditions like diabetes and heart disease (cardiometabolic risk).

Consuming too much added sugar, especially from sugary beverages, increases your risk of weight gain and can lead to visceral fat accumulation.

May Increase Your Risk of Heart Disease: High-sugar “diets” have been associated with an increased risk of many diseases, including heart disease, the number one cause of death worldwide (Cardiovascular Disease).

Evidence suggests that high-sugar “diets” can lead to obesity, inflammation and high triglyceride, blood sugar, and blood pressure levels — all risk factors for heart disease ( Coronary Heart Disease).

Additionally, consuming too much sugar, especially from sugar-sweetened drinks, has been linked to atherosclerosis, a disease characterized by fatty, artery-clogging deposits ( metabolic syndrome).

A study in over 30,000 people found that those who consumed 17–21% of calories from added sugar had a 38% greater risk of dying from heart disease, compared to those consuming only 8% of calories from added sugar (Added sugar).

Just one 16-ounce (473-ml) can of soda contains 52 grams of sugar, which equates to more than 10% of your daily calorie consumption, based on a 2,000-calorie “diet” (Cocoa Cola).

This means that one sugary drink a day can already put you over the recommended daily limit for added sugar.

Consuming too much-added sugar increases heart disease risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, and inflammation. High-sugar “diets” have been linked to an increased risk of dying from heart disease.

Foods with a high glycemic index, such as processed sweets, raise your blood sugar more rapidly than foods with a lower glycemic index.

Sugary foods quickly spike blood sugar and insulin levels, causing increased androgen secretion, oil production, and inflammation, all of which play a role in acne development (acne vulgaris).

Studies have shown that low-glycemic diets are associated with a reduced acne risk, while high-glycemic diets are linked to greater risk (The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet).

For example, a study in 2,300 teens demonstrated that those who frequently consumed added sugar had a 30% greater risk of developing acne (Acne: prevalence and relationship with dietary habits).

Also, many population studies have shown that rural communities that consume traditional, non-processed foods have almost non-existent rates of acne, compared to more urban, high-income areas (The blemishes of modern society).

These findings coincide with the theory that diets high in processed, sugar-laden foods contribute to the development of acne.

High-sugar diets can increase androgen secretion, oil production, and inflammation, all of which can raise your risk of developing acne.

 Increases Your Risk of Diabetes: The worldwide prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled over the past 30 years (National, regional, and global trends in fasting plasma glucose and diabetes ).

Though there are many reasons for this, there is a clear link between excessive sugar consumption and diabetes risk.

Obesity, which is often caused by consuming too much sugar, is considered the strongest risk factor for diabetes (Risk Factors Contributing to Type 2 Diabetes).

What’s more, prolonged high-sugar consumption drives resistance to insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates blood sugar levels.

Insulin resistance causes blood sugar levels to rise and strongly increases your risk of diabetes.

A population study comprising over 175 countries found that the risk of developing diabetes grew by 1.1% for every 150 calories of sugar, or about one can of soda, consumed per day (The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes).

Other studies have also shown that people who drink sugar-sweetened beverages, including fruit juice, are more likely to develop diabetes (Intake of Fruit Juice and Incidence of Type 2 DiabetesAssociation between sugar-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes).

A high-sugar “diet” may lead to obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are risk factors for diabetes.

First, a “diet” rich in sugary foods and beverages can lead to obesity, which significantly raises your risk of cancer (Obesity as a Major Risk Factor for Cancer).

Furthermore, “diets” high in sugar increase inflammation in your body and may cause insulin resistance, both of which increase cancer risk (The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cancer).

A study in over 430,000 people found that added sugar consumption was positively associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, pleural cancer, and cancer of the small intestine (Sugars in diet and risk of cancer).

Another study showed that women who consumed sweet buns and cookies more than three times per week were 1.42 times more likely to develop endometrial cancer than women who consumed these foods less than 0.5 times per week (Sucrose, high-sugar foods, and risk of endometrial cancer).

Research on the link between added sugar intake and cancer is ongoing, and more studies are needed to fully understand this complex relationship.

Too much sugar can lead to obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation, all of which are risk factors for cancer.

Consuming a lot of processed foods, including high-sugar products such as cakes and sugary drinks, has been associated with a higher risk of depression (Sweetened beverages, coffee, and tea and depressionDietary pattern and depressive symptoms).

Researchers believe that blood sugar swings, neurotransmitter dysregulation and inflammation may all be reasons for sugar’s detrimental impact on mental health (Long-term inflammation increases risk).

A study following 8,000 people for 22 years showed that men who consumed 67 grams or more of sugar per day were 23% more likely to develop depression than men who ate less than 40 grams per day (Sugar intake from sweet food and beverages, common mental disorder).

Another study in over 69,000 women demonstrated that those with the highest intakes of added sugars had a significantly greater risk of depression, compared to those with the lowest intakes (High glycemic index diet as a risk factor for depression).

A “diet” rich in added sugar and processed foods may increase depression risk in both men and women.

 

 May Accelerate the Skin Aging Process: Wrinkles are a natural sign of aging. They appear eventually, regardless of your health.

However, poor food choices can worsen wrinkles and speed the skin aging process.

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are compounds formed by reactions between sugar and protein in your body. They are suspected to play a key role in skin aging (Advanced glycation).

Consuming a “diet” high in refined carbs and sugar leads to the production of AGEs, which may cause your skin to age prematurely (The rapid increase in metabolic diseases).

AGEs damage collagen and elastin, which are proteins that help the skin stretch and keep its youthful appearance.

When collagen and elastin become damaged, the skin loses its firmness and begins to sag.

In one study, women who consumed more carbs, including added sugars, had a more wrinkled appearance than women on a high-protein, lower-carb diet (Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance among middle-aged women).

The researchers concluded that a lower intake of carbs was associated with better skin-aging appearance (Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging).

Sugary foods can increase the production of AGEs, which can accelerate skin aging and wrinkle formation.

 

 Can Increase Cellular Aging: Telomeres are structures found at the end of chromosomes, which are molecules that hold part or all of your genetic information.

Telomeres act as protective caps, preventing chromosomes from deteriorating or fusing together.

As you grow older, telomeres naturally shorten, which causes cells to age and malfunction (Nutrition and lifestyle in healthy aging).

Although the shortening of telomeres is a normal part of aging, unhealthy lifestyle choices can speed up the process.

Consuming high amounts of sugar has been shown to accelerate telomere shortening, which increases cellular aging (Effects of nutritional components on aging).

A study in 5,309 adults showed that regularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with shorter telomere length and premature cellular aging ( Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption ).

In fact, each daily 20-ounce (591-ml) serving of sugar-sweetened soda equated to 4.6 additional years of aging, independent of other variables (Soda and Cell Aging).

Eating too much sugar can accelerate the shortening of telomeres, which increases cellular aging.

 

 Drains Your Energy: Foods high in added sugar quickly spike blood sugar and insulin levels, leading to increased energy.

However, this rise in energy levels is fleeting.

Products that are loaded with sugar but lacking in protein, fiber or fat lead to a brief energy boost that’s quickly followed by a sharp drop in blood sugar, often referred to as a crash (A high sugar, low fiber meal leads to higher leptin).

Having constant blood sugar swings can lead to major fluctuations in energy levels (Effects of high sugar and high fiber meals ).

To avoid this energy-draining cycle, choose carb sources that are low in added sugar and rich in fiber.

Pairing carbs with protein or fat is another great way to keep your blood sugar and energy levels stable.

For example, eating an apple along with a small handful of almonds is an excellent snack for prolonged, consistent energy levels.

High-sugar foods can negatively impact your energy levels by causing a spike in blood sugar followed by a crash.

 Can Lead to Fatty Liver: A high intake of fructose has been consistently linked to an increased risk of fatty liver.

Unlike glucose and other types of sugar, which are taken up by many cells throughout the body, fructose is almost exclusively broken down by the liver.

In the liver, fructose is converted into energy or stored as glycogen.

However, the liver can only store so much glycogen before excess amounts are turned into fat.

Large amounts of added sugar in the form of fructose overload your liver, leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition characterized by excessive fat buildup in the liver (fatty liver disease).

A study in over 5,900 adults showed that people who drank sugar-sweetened beverages daily had a 56% higher risk of developing NAFLD, compared to people who did not (39).

Eating too much sugar may lead to NAFLD, a condition in which excessive fat builds up in the liver.


Other Health Risks

Aside from the risks listed above, sugar can harm your body in countless other ways.


Research shows that too much added sugar can:

Research on the impact of added sugar on health is ongoing, and new discoveries are constantly being made.

Consuming too much sugar may worsen cognitive decline, increase gout risk, harm your kidneys and cause cavities.


How to Reduce Your Sugar Intake

Excessive added sugar has many negative health effects.

Although consuming small amounts now and then is perfectly healthy, you should try to cut back on sugar whenever possible.

Fortunately, simply focusing on eating whole, unprocessed foods automatically decreases the amount of sugar in your diet.


Here are some tips on how to reduce your intake of added sugars:

  • Swap sodas, energy drinks, juices and sweetened teas for water or unsweetened seltzer.
  • Drink your coffee black or use Stevia for a zero-calorie, natural sweetener.
  • Sweeten plain yogurt with fresh or frozen berries instead of buying flavored, sugar-loaded yogurt.
  • Consume whole fruits instead of sugar-sweetened fruit smoothies.
  • Replace candy with a homemade trail mix of fruit, nuts and a few dark chocolate chips.
  • Use olive oil and vinegar in place of sweet salad dressings like honey mustard.
  • Choose marinades, nut butters, ketchup and marinara sauce with zero added sugars.
  • Look for cereals, granolas and granola bars with under 4 grams of sugar per serving.
  • Swap your morning cereal for a bowl of rolled oats topped with nut butter and fresh berries, or an omelet made with fresh greens.
  • Instead of jelly, slice fresh bananas onto your peanut butter sandwich.
  • Use natural nut butters in place of sweet spreads like Nutella.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages that are sweetened with soda, juice, honey, sugar or agave.
  • Shop the perimeter of the grocery store, focusing on fresh, whole ingredients.

In addition, keeping a food diary is an excellent way of becoming more aware of the main sources of sugar in your diet.

The best way to limit your added sugar intake is to prepare your own healthy meals at home and avoid buying foods and drinks that are high in added sugar.

Focusing on preparing healthy meals and limiting your intake of foods that contain added sweeteners can help you cut back on the amount of sugar in your “diet”.

Eating too much added sugar can have many negative health effects.

An excess of sweetened foods and beverages can lead to weight gain, blood sugar problems and an increased risk of heart disease, among other dangerous conditions.

For these reasons, added sugar should be kept to a minimum whenever possible, which is easy when you follow a healthy “diet” based on whole foods.

If you need to cut added sugar from your “diet”, try some of the small changes listed above.

Before you know it, your sugar habit will be a thing of the past.


 Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

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Is Cassava Flour Bad For You?

Cassava is a root vegetable widely consumed in developing countries. It provides some important nutrients and resistant starch, which may have health benefits.

On the other hand, cassava can have dangerous effects, especially if it is eaten raw and in large amounts.

This article will explore the unique properties of cassava to determine if it’s a healthy and safe food for you to include in your diet.


What Is Cassava?

Cassava is a nutty-flavored, starchy root vegetable or tuber. Native to South America, it’s a major source of calories and carbs for people in developing countries.

It is grown in tropical regions of the world because of its ability to withstand difficult growing conditions — in fact, it’s one of the most drought-tolerant crops (1).

In the United States, cassava is often called yuca and may also be referred to as manioc or Brazilian arrowroot.

The most commonly consumed part of cassava is the root, which is very versatile. It can be eaten whole, grated or ground into flour to make bread and crackers.

Additionally, cassava root is well known as the raw material that’s used to produce tapioca and garri, a product similar to tapioca.

Individuals with food allergies often benefit from using cassava root in cooking and baking because it is gluten-free, grain-free and nut-free.

One important note is that cassava root must be cooked before it is eaten. Raw cassava can be poisonous, which will be discussed in a later chapter.

Cassava is a versatile root vegetable that is consumed in several parts of the world. It must be cooked before it is eaten.


Contains a Few Key Nutrients

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of boiled cassava root contains 112 calories. 98% of these are from carbs and the rest are from a small amount of protein and fat.

This serving also provides fiber, as well as a few vitamins and minerals.

The following nutrients are found in 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of boiled cassava:

  • Calories: 112
  • Carbs: 27 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Thiamine: 20% of the RDI
  • Phosphorus: 5% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 2% of the RDI
  • Riboflavin: 2% of the RDI

Boiled cassava root also contains small amounts of iron, vitamin C and niacin.

Overall, the nutrition profile of cassava is unremarkable. While it does provide some vitamins and minerals, the amounts are minimal.

There are many other root vegetables you can eat that will provide significantly more nutrients — beets and sweet potatoes, to name two.

Cassava is a significant source of carbs and also provides a small amount of fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

This is because many of the vitamins and minerals are destroyed by processing, as well as most of the fiber and resistant starch.

Therefore, the more popular, processed forms of cassava — such as tapioca and garri — have very limited nutritional value.

For example, 1 ounce (28 grams) of tapioca pearls provides nothing but calories and a small amount of a few minerals.

Boiling cassava root is one cooking method that has been shown to retain most nutrients, with the exception of vitamin C, which is sensitive to heat and easily leaches into the water.

While cassava contains several nutrients, processing methods significantly lower its nutritional value by destroying vitamins and minerals.


It’s High in Calories

Cassava contains 112 calories per 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving, which is quite high compared to other root vegetables (Cassava for Use as a Staple Food).

For example, the same serving of sweet potatoes provides 76 calories, and the same amount of beets provides only 44.

This is what makes cassava such an important crop for developing countries since it is a significant source of calories (Nutritional Value of Cassava).

However, its high-calorie count may do more harm than good for the general population.

Consuming high-calorie foods on a regular basis is associated with weight gain and obesity, so consume cassava in moderation and in reasonable portions (Dietary energy density). An appropriate serving size is about 1/3–1/2 cup (73–113 grams).

Cassava contains a significant number of calories, so consume it in moderation and in appropriate portion sizes.

High in Resistant Starch

Cassava is high in resistant starch, a type of starch that bypasses digestion and has properties similar to soluble fiber.

Consuming foods that are high in resistant starch may have several benefits for overall health.

First of all, resistant starch feeds the beneficial bacteria in your gut, which may help reduce inflammation and promote digestive health (Resistant Starch: Promise for Improving Human HealthRole of resistant starch ).

Resistant starch has also been studied for its ability to contribute to better metabolic health and reduce the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

This is due to its potential to improve blood sugar control, in addition to its role in promoting fullness and reducing appetite (Acute ingestion of resistant starchimproving human healthmetabolic effects and potential health benefitsStarches, Sugars and Obesity).

The benefits of resistant starch are promising, but it is important to note that many processing methods may lower cassava’s resistant starch content.

Products made from cassava, such as flour, tend to be lower in resistant starch than cassava root that has been cooked and then cooled in its whole form (The resistant starchResistant starch in cassava products).

Cassava in its whole form is high in resistant starch, which is known for its role in preventing certain metabolic conditions and promoting gut health.

Contains Antinutrients

One of cassava’s major downfalls is its content of antinutrients.

Antinutrients are plant compounds that may interfere with digestion and inhibit the absorption of vitamins and minerals in the body.

These aren’t a concern for most healthy people, but their effects are important to keep in mind.

They are more likely to impact populations at risk of malnutrition. Interestingly, this includes populations that rely on cassava as a staple food.


Here are the most important antinutrients found in cassava:

The effects of antinutrients are more prominent when they are consumed frequently and as part of a nutritionally inadequate diet.

As long as you only consume cassava on occasion, the antinutrients shouldn’t be a major cause for concern.

In fact, under some circumstances, antinutrients such as tannins and saponins may actually have beneficial health effects (ProanthocyanidinsSaponins as cytotoxic agentsEffects of Saponins on Lipid Metabolism).

The antinutrients in cassava may interfere with the absorption of some vitamins and minerals and may cause digestive distress. This is mainly a concern for populations that rely on cassava as a staple food.


May Have Dangerous Effects in Some Circumstances

Cassava may be dangerous if consumed raw, in large amounts or when it is prepared improperly.

This is because raw cassava contains chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which can release cyanide in the body when consumed.

When eaten frequently, these increase the risk of cyanide poisoning, which may impair thyroid and nerve function. It is associated with paralysis and organ damage and can be fatal (The toxic effects of cassava).

Those who have an overall poor nutrition status and low protein intake are more likely to experience these effects since protein helps rid the body of cyanide (Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide).

This is why cyanide poisoning from cassava is a greater concern for those who live in developing countries. Many people in these countries suffer from protein deficiencies and depend on cassava as a major source of calories (Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide in cassava).

What’s more, in some areas of the world, cassava has been shown to absorb harmful chemicals from the soil, such as arsenic and cadmium. This may increase the risk of cancer in those who depend on cassava as a staple food (Cancer and non-cancer health risk from eating cassava).

Frequent consumption of cassava is associated with cyanide poisoning, especially if it is consumed raw and prepared improperly.


How to Make Cassava Safer for Consumption

Cassava is generally safe when it is prepared properly and eaten occasionally in moderate amounts. A reasonable serving size is about 1/3–1/2 cup.

Here are some ways you can make cassava safer for consumption cassava,Cassava Processing):

  • Peel it: The peel of cassava root contains most of the cyanide-producing compounds.
  • Soak it: Soaking cassava by submerging it in water for 48–60 hours before it is cooked and eaten may reduce the amount of harmful chemicals it contains.
  • Cook it: Since the harmful chemicals are found in raw cassava, it’s essential to cook it thoroughly — by boiling, roasting or baking, for example.
  • Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanidePair it with protein: Eating some protein along with cassava may be beneficial since protein helps rid the body of toxic cyanide
  • Maintain a balanced diet: You can prevent adverse effects from cassava by including a variety of foods in your diet and not relying on it as your sole source of nutrition.

It’s important to note that products made from cassava root, such as cassava flour and tapioca, contain extremely little to no cyanide-inducing compounds and are safe for human consumption.

You can make cassava safer for consumption with several strategies, including using certain preparation methods and consuming it in reasonable portions.


How to Use Cassava

There are many ways you can incorporate cassava into your diet.

You can prepare several snacks and dishes with the root on its own. It is commonly sliced and then baked or roasted, similar to the way you would prepare a potato.

Additionally, cassava root can be mashed or mixed in with stir-fries, omelets, and soups. It’s also sometimes ground into flour and used in bread and crackers.

You can also enjoy it in the form of tapioca, which is a starch extracted from the cassava root through a process of washing and pulping.

Tapioca is commonly used as a thickener for puddings, pies, and soups.

Cassava is typically used in the same way that you would use potatoes and makes an excellent addition to just about any dish. It can also be ground into flour or enjoyed in the form of tapioca.

Cassava contains some healthful properties, but its negative effects appear to outweigh the benefits.

Not only is it high in calories and antinutrients — it can cause cyanide poisoning when prepared improperly or consumed in large amounts.

While this is mostly a concern for those who rely on cassava as a staple food, it is still important to keep in mind.

Additionally, cassava-based products like tapioca have been processed enough to remove toxic chemicals and are not dangerous to consume.

Overall, cassava is not a food that needs to be a regular part of your diet. If you do eat it, prepare it properly and eat it in reasonable portions.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

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Lazy Ways To Lose Weight

The one thing I can be when it comes to working out or any type of physical exercise is lazy. Long hours each day is taxing I can’t imagine any amount of time at the gym and restrictive “diets” are tough to maintain when you want to lose weight. Grocery and bill budgets and busy schedules might not allow us to attend a gym sesh every morning and eating organic food and green juices (yeah right). Although exercise is important for good health, there are easy ways to lose weight without stepping foot into your local gym. Don’t get demoralized! Only a few slight changes to your daily routine can be enough to slim down:

If you missed yesterday’s post you can Click Here

And if you want to buy and pruvit products (not sponsored or affiliated) with the company and I DO NOT make a commission if you buy anything. Here is Katherine’s pruvit link ( this is the person that I buy all of my keto products from). 


 Use Smaller Plates

It’s natural to want to fill up your plate, but by using a smaller one, you can fill your plate and still cut down on the amount of food you end up eating. You actually trick your mind into thinking you ate more than you did since your plate looks so full.


 Take The Stairs

It may seem daunting, but taking the stairs instead of an elevator can tone your tush in no time. It’s strength training without actually hitting the gym, so opt for stairs the next time you need to head up a few flights!


 Don’t Eat in Front of the TV

When you’re distracted, you’re not paying attention to how much food you’re consuming. Researchers have found that watching TV or watching a movie at home while eating leads to higher calorie consumption since you’re eating without thinking. Be especially mindful while snacking so you can avoid packing on extra pounds.


Drink “Skinny Cocktails”

Happy hours and boozy brunches are fun but they can lead to over-indulging on high-caloric cocktails. Try these calorie-cutting hacks for healthier cocktails instead!


Get More Sleep

Studies have shown that lack of sleep can lead to weight gain, a slower metabolism, and an increased risk of obesity and diabetes. So, clock in an extra few hours of shut-eye to ensure you keep your waistline slim and your energy up.


 Don’t Deny Yourself Sweets

Denying yourself your favorite snack will only make you crave it more. We always want what we can’t have!. Instead of cutting out sweets entirely, allow yourself to indulge in that fun-size bag of Doritos or two scoops of gelato once a week. That way, you won’t binge on your favorite treats if you fall off the wagon once or twice (which, by the way, you shouldn’t beat yourself up about — it happens). 


 Down a Glass of Water Before Meals

It’s easy to confuse hunger with thirst, so drink a glass of water before a big meal to ensure you’re not simply thirsty. A glass of agua will make you feel fuller so you won’t eat as much during your meal.   


 

Learn to Love Green Tea

Save those Frappuccinos for an occasional treat and learn to love the green stuff — no, not money, teaGreen tea is known to reduce belly fat, boost metabolism and help digestion, so drink up!


Limit Going Out to Dinner to Eat

Unlimited breadsticks, anyone? It’s nice to treat yourself to a meal out with friends every once in a while, but restaurant portions are always much bigger than anything you would normally make at home. Save the night’s out for special occasions so you can indulge within reason.


Eat Sitting Down

Studies have found that eating while standing up is not only bad for digestion, it actually leads you to consume more calories. When standing up, you eat food more quickly, so you’re more likely not to realize how full you’ve actually become. Take a few minutes to sit down and enjoy your meal.


 Don’t Drink Your Calories

You might be sabotaging your own diet plan without even realizing it! Drinking high-calorie beverages might not seem like a big deal at the time, but at the end of the day it adds up. Your morning Starbucks latte has an average of 265 calories, your afternoon soda has 227, and your evening ice tea has 180. When all is said and done, you’re approaching nearly 1000 calories in drinks alone! One of the easiest ways to lose weight is to replace your sugary beverages with water.


 Walk Everywhere

 If you just can’t seem to squeeze in a workout sesh at your gym, torch a few extra calories by choosing to walk as much as you can. Take a walk around the office at lunchtime, or skip the bus and walk to work. Walking increases cardiovascular health and strengthens muscles. Studies have even shown that it may even be just as good for you as running!


Ditch the Sweatpants

News Flash: You know those glorious, ultra-comfortable, 10-year-old pair of sweatpants you love so much? They are not your friend. Sweatpants are the most forgiving piece of clothing out there — which is why we love them when we feel bloated before our periods, but not so much when we’re minding our weight. Jeans, on the other hand, will tell you right away if you’re bursting with food and help you say “no, thanks!” to seconds.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Bloglovin’ :Amanda Explains It

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Steller: AmandaLei

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Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

Paleo “Superfoods”

In today’s post, I talk about some “superfoods” that you might think is but really aren’t.

I like the idea behind the paleo “diet”. It seems sensible to try to emulate the “diet” our ancestors ate while we were evolving.

However… even though I like the idea, I don’t like the way the “diet” is prescribed in many cases. It seems to have gone beyond just science and started becoming more about ideology. There are many modern foods that are healthy but actively discouraged on the paleo “diet”. I think this is a huge mistake.

Nutrition should be about science and doing what works best for the individual, NOT ideology. Humans evolved eating a variety of foods and our genes have changed (not much, but some) since the paleolithic period. I think the idea of a paleotemplate is more reasonable.

That is, eat the foods humans evolved eating, then add the modern foods that you like, tolerate and science has shown to be healthy.

Here are 4 foods that technically aren’t paleo, but are still super healthy.

1. Full-Fat Dairy Products From Grass-Fed Cows

One of the pillars of a strict paleo diet is the elimination of all dairy products.

I think this is a mistake… because plenty of people can tolerate dairy just fine.

Although a large part of the world is lactose intolerant, many populations have acquired an enzyme to break down and make full use of lactose, the main carbohydrate found in milk (Milk).

Full-fat dairy products are particularly healthy, as long as they come from grass-fed cows. This includes foods like butter, cheese, and full-fat yogurt.

Full-fat dairy contains bioactive fatty acids like butyrate, which is potently anti-inflammatory (234).

Best of all, full-fat dairy products are loaded with Vitamin K2, a powerful but often ignored nutrient that regulates calcium metabolism in the body.

Most importantly, Vitamin K2 helps to keep calcium inside our bones and outside of our arteries (56).

Studies have shown that Vitamin K2 is highly protective against fractures (lowering the risk by 60-81%) and cardiovascular disease (78). The Rotterdam study showed that people who had the highest K2 intake had a 57% lower risk of heart disease and a 26% lower risk of death from all causes, over a 7-10 year period (9).

In countries where cows are largely grass-fed, consuming full-fat dairy products is linked to major reductions in the risk of heart disease (101112). One study from Australia showed that those who ate the most full-fat dairy had a 69% lower risk of dying from heart disease than those who ate the least (13).

A lot of people are concerned that because full-fat dairy is high in fat and calories, that it can cause weight gain. However… the evidence disagrees. In fact, eating dairy fat is linked to a reduced risk of obesity in numerous studies (14).

That being said, there are some people who can’t tolerate dairy. If you get some sort of negative reaction from eating dairy products, then by all means avoid them. But for people who do tolerate and enjoy them, then there is absolutely no scientifically valid reason to avoid quality dairy products from grass-fed cows.

Unprocessed, full-fat dairy products from grass-fed cows are incredibly healthy. They are high in important vitamins like Vitamin K2, as well as beneficial fatty acids like butyrate.

Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate is one of those rare indulgent foods that happen to be incredibly healthy and nutritious. Derived from cocoa beans, it is one of the best sources of antioxidants in the world. One study showed that cocoa was even higher in antioxidants than blueberries and acai berries (15). Dark chocolate is very high in fiber and minerals like magnesium, iron, copper, manganese and various others (16).

One problem with chocolate, in general, is that it often contains some sugar. However, if you choose dark chocolate with 70-85% (or higher) cocoa content, then the sugar amount will be minimal and the benefits will far outweigh the negatives.

There have actually been numerous studies on the health benefits of dark chocolate and cocoa, especially for heart and brain function (1718).

Dark chocolate and cocoa can lower blood pressure, raise HDL cholesterol and protect LDL particles from oxidative damage (19202122).

There are also studies showing that dark chocolate can reduce insulin resistance, a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and heart disease (2324).

In some studies, people who eat the most cocoa and dark chocolate have a 50-57% lower risk of heart disease, which is an insanely high number (2526).

Of course, these types of studies are observational in nature and can not prove that the chocolate caused a reduction in risk.

But given the confirmed effects on important risk factors like blood pressure, insulin resistance and LDL oxidation, I find it plausible that dark chocolate and cocoa could, in fact, reduce heart disease risk (27).

That being said, the benefits of dark chocolate don’t end with the heart. There are also studies showing that it can cause major improvements in brain function (at least in the elderly) and give the skin natural protection against sunburn (2829).

Dark chocolate wasn’t available in the paleolithic period, but it’s still one of the healthiest foods you can eat. Just make sure to choose quality, organic dark chocolate with a high cocoa content… and don’t eat a lot of it, think of it more as a supplement.

One or two squares per day or a few times per week should be enough.

Dark chocolate is a “modern” food, but numerous studies show that it has powerful health benefits, especially for heart health.

White Potatoes

The original paleo diet book took a hard stance against potatoes.

I don’t think this makes a lot of sense… because potatoes are a root vegetable that was available in the paleolithic period.

Some other versions of paleo, like the Perfect Health Diet, actively encourage foods like potatoes, which they refer to as “safe” starches.

Potatoes are actually incredibly nutritious. A single potato contains lots of Vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron and various other nutrients (30).

Really… potatoes contain almost every nutrient we need in some amount, including a decent amount of protein with all the essential amino acids. There have even been accounts of people living on nothing but potatoes for long periods of time, without any apparent negative effects on health.

Another important feature of potatoes is that they may just be the most fulfilling food in existence. In fact, they score higher on a scale called the satiety index than any other food tested (31). What this means is that by eating potatoes, you will feel naturally full and end up eating less of other foods instead.

If you want to make your potatoes even healthier, you can allow them to cool after cooking them. This greatly increases the resistant starch content, which is an indigestible type of starch that functions like soluble fiber (3233).

The only problem with potatoes is the high carb content, so people who are on a very low-carb diet may want to avoid them.

But for people who are active and metabolically healthy, potatoes are pretty close to being nature’s perfect food. It makes absolutely no sense why they shouldn’t be allowed on a paleo diet. They’re as “real” as a food can get.

White potatoes were discouraged in the original version of the paleo diet. However, they are incredibly healthy, highly nutritious and among the most fulfilling foods in existence.

Coffee

Despite having been demonized in the past, studies have now shown that coffee is actually very healthy.

It is loaded with antioxidants… people who eat a Western diet actually get more antioxidants from coffee than fruits and vegetables, combined (343536).Studies have consistently linked coffee consumption to a lower risk of many diseases, especially type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and liver diseases (37383940).

Not only that, but numerous studies suggest that people who drink coffee live longer than people who don’t (4142).

Coffee is actively discouraged in the original paleo diet book, although others like The Primal Blueprint (my favorite version) to allow for coffee. Although some people are overly sensitive to caffeine, most people can tolerate coffee just fine.

As long as you don’t drink too much and don’t drink it late in the day (which can have negative effects on sleep), then there is absolutely NO reason to avoid coffee if you enjoy it.

Coffee was probably not consumed in the paleolithic period (neither was tea, for that matter), but it’s still very healthy and incredibly enjoyable.

Just make sure to choose quality coffee and don’t put sugar in it.

Some Thoughts

The truth is, we don’t even know exactly what our paleolithic ancestors ate and there is also no “one” type of paleo diet.

What people ate varied greatly between regions, depending on the food that was available at the time. Some ate a high-carb diet high in plants, others a low-carb diet high in animal foods.

The one thing I do know for certain is that paleolithic humans didn’t eat anything made in a factory. This includes refined sugar, refined grains, trans fats, veggie oils and any sort of processed food that is impossible to make naturally.

Humans evolved eating real food… plain and simple. That’s what we should be focusing on. It is a good idea to consider the foods humans evolved eating because it is likely that these foods will be both safe and healthy for our bodies. But there are plenty of “modern” foods that are healthy too. Just because it’s new, doesn’t mean it’s bad.

Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Bloglovin’ :Amanda Explains It

Bumble Bizz: Amanda

Poshmark: AmandaLei

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NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

Zevia Organic Tea

Quick Note: I have a bunch of keto related posts coming soon. I have another 60 hr. Reboot posts coming, a keto reboot excel post, more keto grocery related content and much more. If keto is your thing or you know someone who is interested (beginners) then my blog is for you (or your friend). Don’t forget to check back daily for all the keto related content that is to come.

Zevia, is the leading zero-calorie, naturally sweetened beverage company, today announced Zevia Organic Tea, a line of eight Ready-To-Drink (RTD) Tea flavors. Like all Zevia products, these items are zero calories, naturally sweetened with stevia, and contain zero sugar. In addition, Zevia Organic Teas are non-carbonated, non-GMO, brewed with Fair Trade Certified Tea, and will carry the USDA Organic seal. The flavors include Black Tea, Green Tea, and herbal flavors, featuring two caffeine-free options.

With this announcement, Zevia’s product lines encompass a broad range of Liquid Refreshment Beverage (LRB) categories, including Soda, Energy drinks, Sparkling Water, Mixers and now RTD Tea. With simple, plant-based ingredients and products for every family member and usage occasion, Zevia has become a favorite among shoppers seeking better-for-you alternatives to sugary and artificially sweetened beverages.

Sugar reduction has rapidly become the number one consumer concern, with 84% of US shoppers seeking to reduce their sugar intake. Zevia was the first zero-calorie, naturally sweetened beverage brand, and they are continuing to build on their leadership with great-tasting new products to support a low-sugar lifestyle.

Almost half of the added sugar coming from beverages, Zevia provides an easy way for consumers to kickstart a sugar reduction program. Zevia Tea will be sold in 12 oz. sleek cans with a suggested retail price of $1.99 each, available nationwide now.

About Zevia

Zevia is the first beverage brand exclusively focused on naturally sweetened, zero calorie beverages, including Soda, Energy, Sparking Water, Ready-To-Drink Tea, and Mixers lines. With formulas that are Non-GMO Project Verified, Vegan, Kosher, color-free and Gluten Free, Zevia is sold at more than 40,000 grocery, natural and specialty food stores in the United States and Canada, including Whole Foods Market, Sprouts Farmers Markets, Safeway, Kroger, Target and Amazon.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Bloglovin’ :Amanda Explains It

Bumble Bizz: Amanda

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

Vital Proteins’ Collagen Peptides

 

If you’re into the keto diet, looking for a way to build muscle, or simply just want to lose some weight, the supplementation of collagen peptides could do wonders to help you achieve your goals.

Collagen has been one of the most raved about structural proteins in recent times when it comes to skincare, beauty, health, and performance. But, with the sales pitches coming from almost every angle, it’s hard to know what’s true and what’s not.


What Is Collagen and Why You Need It

Put simply, collagen accounts for approximately a third of your body’s protein composition. It plays an important role in the formation of your skin, bones, muscle, tendons, and ligaments and is found in your cornea, blood vessels, and teeth. It has so many scientifically proven health benefits which you can read more here.

In plain English, it’s the glue that holds everything together. It’s also why the word collagen derives from the Greek word “kólla” which means glue.

Those who are looking to build muscle or to increase mass and strength, a 2015 study showed that consuming collagen peptides while doing strength training increased muscle mass and strength .

For beauty purposes, consumption of collagen supplements helps improve skin elasticity, appearance, and minimize lines and wrinkles. Not only does it promote more youthful skin, but collagen also enhances the strength of your hair particles as well as your nails and joints (2)

For weight loss purpose, collagen also helps you reach your goals by helping you feel fuller for longer when compared to whey, soy, and even casein (4).

For keto “diet” enthusiasts, collagen peptides work very well when combined with the keto diet as it has a very low amount of calories and carbs.

For example, Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides (Unflavored) only has 70 calories for each serving (two scoops). So if you are looking for low carb protein powder to make your keto-friendly protein shakes, collagen powder is an excellent choice.


The Difference Between Collagen Protein and Other Types of Protein

The main difference between collagen and other proteins is the amino acid profile. Collagen has more essential amino acids such as alanine, arginine, proline, and hydroxyproline that make collagen unique in terms of how they benefit parts of your body such as hair, nail, ligaments, joints, tendons, skin, and digestion.


Vital Proteins’ Collagen Peptides

With so many collagen protein options to choose from, it’s common sense to pose the question of why you should choose Vital Proteins over other brands. What makes it one of the best collagen supplements out there?

In short, Vital Proteins’ collagen is grass-fed, pasture-raised, gluten-free, dairy-free and non-GMO. It’s Kosher and Whole 30 approved as well as being keto friendly.

It is unflavored and versatile so basically, you can use in any drink, dish and recipes that you wish to without destroying its taste and flavor. Another bonus is that this collagen is super soluble and easy to mix in both hot and cold liquids.

Many women in the keto community love this product and they use it every day and notice incredible results with their hair, nail, and skin. They experience healthier hair with less breakage and split ends.

If you are experiencing hair loss on a low carb ketogenic “diet”, maybe it’s not because of the diet itself, but could be due to many factors. One of the factors could be because your body is craving collagen. As we mentioned earlier, collagen makes up almost 30% of the protein content in our bodies. If you don’t consume enough of it, you might experience skin, hair and nails issues.

Vital Proteins' Collagen PeptidesSave

Check Current Price

Based on our experience coupled with facts gathered from the manufacturer themselves and the reviews from the health and fitness community, here’s a list of Pros and Cons of going with Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides.


The Pros

 Grass-Fed Cows

Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides “are sourced from grass-fed, pasture-raised bovine hides”. I’d like to draw emphasis to the fact that the cows are grass-fed which always triumphs over grain-fed cows based. Grass-fed beef contains more cancer-fighting antioxidants and is also higher in Vitamin A and E (5).

To put it simply, grass-fed cows contain up to five times more omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed cows which is the key to reducing inflammation and aids in lowering the risks of chronic diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids are also critical in improving cognitive and behavioral function which impacts your overall well-being and physical abilities (678).

The fact that Vital Proteins’ Collagen is derived from grass-fed cows definitely wins a thumbs up from us in that arena.


 Bioavailability

If you don’t know what bioavailability means, it’s essentially the ability for your body to digest and absorb a solution quickly in order to maximize the benefits obtainable from that solution.

Based on my experience, I found it extremely easy to dilute the powder with cold water without leaving any nasty powder clumps in the mixture which goes to show how soluble it is.

The recommended dosage is 1 to 2 scoops of Vital Proteins into 8 ounces of any liquid to be consumed twice a day.

Having gone with the unflavored option, our liquid of choice to mix the powder with is coffee in the morning and a smoothie in the afternoon. The powder dissolved quickly and smoothly and there is no noticeable taste difference in both coffee or smoothie, which is a huge perk.

You can make your milkshake or protein shake by simply adding  1-2 scoops of this to your milk (or milk of choice). If you’re on keto, add 1 scoop of collagen in your coconut milk or almond milk. Optional choices are ice, sweetener, etc…

The unflavored collagen makes it so easy to add it to any other liquids without a noticeable change in flavor. If you like your coffee black, adding this wouldn’t change your coffee’s taste at all.


 Free from Gluten, rBGH, GMO, Dairy, and Ractopamine

If you’re looking to lose weight or to build a leaner and more toned figure, gluten is not your best friend. The fact that Vitals Protein is gluten-free makes this supplement highly attractive from all angles be it weight loss or muscle building.

It’s also nice to know that a collagen peptide supplement that derives from bovine hide does not contain artificial hormones that can be damaging to our health!


Contains Arginine and Alanine

If you’re looking to build muscle mass, the fact that this product contains Arginine and Alanine is a huge plus compared to other collagen proteins.

Arginine is critical in protein synthesis which supports the development of muscle mass and acts as a treatment for several health issues such as congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and erectile dysfunction (9).

Alanine is crucial as an aid to increasing carnosine in your body which acts as a powerful antioxidant. The more alanine in your system, the higher your acid-buffering capacity becomes thus allowing your muscles to push your workouts and training harder due to a slower lactic acid release in your muscles (10).


The Cons

The only downside to Vital Proteins I can think of is it’s a little bit more expensive compared to other collagen products. It is understandable because Vital Proteins use the best quality bovine hide collagen peptides to make their products. If you value quality and the amazing benefits of this product, I think the price isn’t an issue.

Also, if you are a vegan or vegetarian, collagen peptides are not for you unfortunately because they are sourced from grass-fed bovine.


How To Use Collagen:

Stir into hot/cold water or other beverages.

Add to coffee for extra creaminess and frothiness.

Add to smoothies and shakes as a protein booster

Add into any desserts and baking recipes


The Conclusion

If you’re looking for a high-quality collagen peptide supplement, we highly recommend Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides. If you’re like many people, you will notice its benefits when you commit to a consistent intake of the supplement over a period of 6-8 weeks. You will appreciate the results witnessed after. Give it a try today!


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Bloglovin’ :Amanda Explains It

Bumble Bizz: Amanda

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

 


How To Drink Starbucks While On Keto

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned how that I would be extending blogmas until December 31st. These posts won’t be holiday related as Christmas has since passed (Yesterday) Happy The Day After Christmas. What I will be doing Is adding some New Year’s related content to help you continue to stay on track and I will slowly be adding more of my normal content over the next week or so.

PLEASE READ: I have been thinking that I wanted to do something different for my blog next year and that Is more content that you want to see. I know that at the and of every post I ALWAYS ask what you would like to see. I MEAN I REALLY want to do more content related to what you want to see. It can be “Diet” related, fitness, nutrition or even advice posts. I post what I post because It means something to mean I won’t post something if I didn’t believe in it. I want to take this blog to the next level and I want you all of my followers (friends) to be apart of the ride. So please don’t hesitate in reaching out with any and all suggestions. You can find all of my links at the end of every post in the “Thank You” section and in the section “Where You Can Follow Me”. 

If you have missed #Blogmas all the links are listed in the section titled Blogmas which will be in right under this.

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 25! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 22 Days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-29

*I realized that my #blogmas days had repeated tagged posts and that not every post was linked. I caught the mistake and fixed it. Every link should now be clickable and days 1-18 are now linked. If you are new to #blogmas you can catch up below.

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6 Blogmas Day 7 Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10 Blogmas Day 11 Blogmas Day 12 Blogmas Day 13 Blogmas Day 14  Blogmas Day 15  Blogmas Day 16 Blogmas Day 17 Blogmas Day 18  Blogmas Day 19 Blogmas Day 20 Blogmas Day 21 Blogmas Day 22 Blogmas Day 23 Blogmas Day 24 Blogmas Day 25 Blogmas Day 26 Blogmas Day 27 Blogmas Day 28 Blogmas Day 29


When you’re on The Ketogenic Diet, at first, you feel like an unstoppable one-woman keto army—cooking at home, meal-prepping, even brewing your own coffee.

But damn, that’s hard—especially when all you want to do is go for a Starbucks run.

Good news, though: You don’t have to give up your beloved ‘bucks orders. There are plenty of options out there so you can stay keto and enjoy your fave morning (or afternoon, or evening) pick-me-up in the process.

Overall, you want to stick with four simple rules,  First, order sugar-free options, since sugar = carbs. Next, opt for heavy cream over regular milk (again, lactose is another carb). And then consider adding unsweetened nut milk(s) like almond or coconut to drinks. 

But those are just the basics. Here are some specific drinks—based on your specific needs (and mood)—that are still totally keto friendly

Black coffee’s always a safe bet, but if you can’t stomach that…

Black coffee—hot, iced, or cold brew—is always going to be a winner in the keto department but it’s a little…intense.

Still, it’s calorie-free with no sugar, which is definitely keto, Upton points out. At two to five calories per serving, coffee (brewed, espresso, or instant) simply does not have enough carbohydrates to get someone off track of their keto “diet”.

If you just can’t have yours straight up, it’s 100 percent okay to add heavy cream and a flavoring like cinnamon or sugar-free syrup. If you need a little sweetener (fair), bypass the sugar and try a little stevia. Sugar subs that have no calories or carbs can fit on the “diet”.

If you need something hot and sweet…I got you covered.

Sure, you can be on your keto A-game on most days, but sometimes you just need a good, comforting cup of something warm and sweet.

You can do an Americano (a.k.a., espresso and water) and add heavy cream and stevia, order a cappuccino or flat white with heavy cream instead of milk, get a mocha with half heavy cream and half water (to create a “milk”), or have a latte with an unsweetened nut milk and add your own flavoring.

The high fat and low sugar content of coconut milk can work on a keto “diet” if factored into the total daily allowance, Heavy cream has a high fat and low sugar content, making it great for keto.

Sure, not everyone is into coffee, but Starbucks clearly has some cool drinks that look amazing on Instagram. If you’re just going for the likes, you can DIY a pink drink that looks awesome in pics.

Plenty of people have shared a variation of this on Instagram, but it basically involves mixing Starbucks’ passion fruit iced tea with a few pumps of sugar-free vanilla syrup, and cream. You can have it blended or just over ice. Voila!

This doesn’t have a lot of carbs so it would fit. One cup of herbal tea has about 0.5 grams of carbohydrate per eight-ounce serving, the sugar-free vanilla syrup has so little carbohydrate content that it can state zero on any packaging, and heavy whipping cream has about one gram of carbohydrate per ounce. At the same time, it has almost 100 calories which can help you meet your macro targets.

Any Starbucks hot or iced tea, without sweetener, is a safe bet, Upton says. Or you could get a chai-brewed tea and add some heavy cream to the mix. (Just make sure to ask for brewed chai vs. the stuff they pour out of a box—that has sugar in it… Actually, the boxed stuff has more than the daily recommended amount of sugar).

Be Cautious, though: Some of their blended teas and tea lattes (even if you sub in cream) are off-limits since they contain sugar.

Getting a Starbucks reward feels almost as good as winning the lottery, and you don’t want to blow it on something basic like black coffee.

If you have a reward that you can’t wait to spend, try asking a barista to mix up a keto-friendly Frappucino. Start with the basics: Order a Frapp made with unsweetened almond, coconut milk, or heavy cream, and whatever sugar-free flavoring is your pleasure (vanilla, caramel, hazelnut…there are a bunch to choose from).

Keto is about cutting carbs and not limiting fat. That’s why cream and coconut milk are okay.

Clearly, the bagel, croissant, and banana bread aren’t going to fly, but their bacon and gruyere sous vide egg bites are a solid high-fat, low-carb option, Warren says.

Per serving: 310 calories, 22 g fat (14 g sat), 9 g carbs, 2 g sugar, 600 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 19 g protein.

Starbucks has several protein boxes that are solid for when you’re on the go, but most also contain fruit (carbs) and crackers (totally obvious carbs).

Still, that doesn’t mean they can’t fill you up when you’re keto. You can opt for the egg and cheese protein box and just skip the fruit and bread, or go for the Felino Uncured Italian Salami and Manchego box. Starbucks also usually has string cheese and Moon Cheese handy, both of which would make a solid snack.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

 

How To Shed Winter Weight In The Spring

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned how that I would be extending blogmas until December 31st. These posts won’t be holiday related as Christmas has since passed (Yesterday) Happy The Day After Christmas. What I will be doing Is adding some New Year’s related content to help you continue to stay on track and I will slowly be adding more of my normal content over the next week or so.

PLEASE READ: I have been thinking that I wanted to do something different for my blog next year and that Is more content that you want to see. I know that at the and of every post I ALWAYS ask what you would like to see. I MEAN I REALLY want to do more content related to what you want to see. It can be “Diet” related, fitness, nutrition or even advice posts. I post what I post because It means something to mean I won’t post something if I didn’t believe in it. I want to take this blog to the next level and I want you all of my followers (friends) to be apart of the ride. So please don’t hesitate in reaching out with any and all suggestions. You can find all of my links at the end of every post in the “Thank You” section and in the section “Where You Can Follow Me”. 

If you have missed #Blogmas all the links are listed in the section titled Blogmas which will be in right under this.

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 25! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 22 Days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-25

*I realized that my #blogmas days had repeated tagged posts and that not every post was linked. I caught the mistake and fixed it. Every link should now be clickable and days 1-18 are now linked. If you are new to #blogmas you can catch up below.

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6 Blogmas Day 7 Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10 Blogmas Day 11 Blogmas Day 12 Blogmas Day 13 Blogmas Day 14  Blogmas Day 15  Blogmas Day 16 Blogmas Day 17 Blogmas Day 18  Blogmas Day 19 Blogmas Day 20 Blogmas Day 21 Blogmas Day 22 Blogmas Day 23 Blogmas Day 24 Blogmas Day 25 Blogmas Day 26


If the thought of coming out from beneath your baggy cold-weather sweaters is making you break out in a cold sweat, relax! You still have plenty of time to lose weight and look your best before sundress season arrives. Spring is actually the best season to find foods that are packed with the weight-loss-super star, fiber. This macronutrient helps fill you up, can clean you out, and makes achieving your weight loss goals a whole lot easier. What’s more, these particular foods are also bursting with micronutrients that help turn off your fat-storage genes, leading to even more rapid, sustainable weight loss.

When you eat foods that are in season, they’re not only more affordable, but they’re also fresher and packed with the highest amount of flavor and nutritional value. We’ve compiled a list of 20 fruits and veggies that are in peak season every spring—they’re all easy to find, too! Since many of them will only be on sale for a few weeks of the season, you better act fast.

So, say goodbye to stews and slow cookers and start blasting away those extra winter pounds with these spring foods. To help you incorporate them into your diet, I’ve also included some bloggers favorite recipes and ways to enjoy them.

Fiddlehead Ferns

Spring foods fiddlehead ferns

These delicate spirals are the furled fronds of a young fern, which is why they are only around for a few weeks in early spring. They’re packed with manganese, vitamin C, vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids, and fiber, which inhibits the release of the hunger hormone ghrelin, helping you to minimize munching. And if you thought bananas were the potassium powerhouse, then you’ll be interested to know these give the yellow fruit a run for its money. Fiddleheads actually have more of the bloat-banishing mineral per gram than bananas, which can also help lower blood pressure and protect against heart attack and stroke.

How to Eat It: Clean the veggie by removing any of the papery outer coatings; then soak it briefly in a bath of cold water with a bit of lemon and salt. Drain and then steam them for four or five minutes. Add the steamed fiddleheads to a skillet with a couple of tablespoons of unsalted butter and cook on each side for a minute or two. They’ll turn golden like asparagus. Add salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Rhubarb

Spring foods rhubarb

This plant might look like red-hued celery, but if you’ve ever been adventurous enough to cook with it, you know that this vegetable is much more flavorful than its vibrant twin. Tart rhubarb loves to partner with fruit to become a sweet treat. (Just don’t eat the leaves—they’re poisonous!) Rhubarb is high in catechins, the same compound that gives green tea its belly-fat fighting properties. Catechins blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly) and then speed up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.

How to  Eat It: Wash, dry, and trim the stalk at the root and leaves. Cut a slit under the edge of the rhubarb skin at one end and pull down the remove the stringy fibers, similar to what you would do with celery. Cut stalks into 2-inch pieces, toss with cinnamon, honey, lemon zest, and vanilla extract and roast in a 350-degree oven until the rhubarb is tender, about 30 minutes. Serve on top of some full-fat Greek yogurt and top with crunchy pistachios.


 Mushrooms

Spring foods morel mushroomsThese mushrooms are the third highest vegetable source of vitamin D (only behind two other mushrooms), serving you 23 percent of your daily value in a single cup. This vitamin has many biological functions beyond its classic role in bone metabolism, one of which is regulating your immune system. One study found that when vitamin D concentrations were low in a group of runners had a biomarker for increased inflammation. When your body is in a state of chronic inflammation, it can lead to clogged arteries, worsened insulin resistance, and even weight gain. So besides climbing out of that cold, dreary hole that you dug yourself into this winter and catching some Vitamin-D-producing rays, make sure to grab some morel mushrooms!

How to  Eat It: These wild mushrooms are prized for their smoky, nutty flavor, which pairs well with Parmesan in a risotto. First, because of their folds and ridges, they’ll need to be washed under cool water and scrubbed thoroughly. Sautée them up with olive oil, a little butter, and chopped garlic until golden brown. Season with salt, pepper, fresh thyme, and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Throw on top of risotto, like this one from Pinch of Yum, with freshly grated parmesan and some lemon zest.


Asparagus

Spring foods asparagus

The ultimate spring vegetable, asparagus is rich in potassium and low in sodium, which helps your body achieve proper electrolyte balance and works to reduce bloating. Add the plant’s anti-inflammatory phytonutrients and health-promoting antioxidants—like glutathione, a detoxifying compound that helps break down carcinogens and other harmful free radicals—and you’ve got yourself a powerful weight-loss arrow in your quiver.

How to  Eat It: You probably already know that these delicious veggies don’t need much to make them taste great, but feel free to shake things up a bit with a quick vinaigrette. Whisk together olive oil, lemon zest, dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, and minced garlic. Pour half the vinaigrette over the spears and grill until tender. Once cooked, plate and drizzle the rest of the vinaigrette on top.


Red Leaf Lettuce

Spring foods red leaf lettuce

One serving of red leaf lettuce is only 14 calories, but it’s bursting with fiber. It’s one of the world’s greatest weight loss foods because it will fill you up and keep you feeling full for hours after you eat it. Even better, two generous cups of lettuce provide 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement for strong, healthy bones. A report from the Nurses’ Health Study suggests that women who eat a serving of lettuce every day cut the risk of hip fracture by 30 percent than when compared with eating just one serving a week.

How to  Eat It: Create a simple vinaigrette with red wine vinegar, dijon mustard, olive oil, minced shallots, a touch of honey, salt, and pepper. Combine roughly chopped red leaf lettuce with arugula, another spring lettuce, and top with spring veggies like roasted beets, orange slices, and walnuts.


Peas

Spring foods peas

You may have pushed them around your plate as a kid, but we’re hoping that stopped when you learned of their anti-aging, immune-strengthening, and energy-boosting antioxidants. Besides teeming with carotenoids and polyphenols, these little green poppers contain a hefty 7 grams of hunger-quelling fiber and 8 grams of muscle-building protein per cup!

How to Eat It: To elevate the humble pea, saute up some crispy prosciutto. Add some finely chopped white onion and a bit of minced garlic. Once tender, add in your peas, and a little bit of chicken stock, and simmer until peas are tender. Add back in the prosciutto, chopped fresh parsley, and mint, and toss it all together with your favorite pasta and freshly grated parmesan.


Artichokes

Spring foods artichokes

Unfortunately, a hefty, creamy artichoke dip will never make it onto any diet-friendly list, but one of its main ingredients does! One medium artichoke boasts an impressive 10.3 grams of fiber, including inulin, a prebiotic soluble fiber that helps promote the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria. Incorporating it into your diet may also aid weight loss efforts—for every 10 grams of fiber you eat daily, your middle will carry almost 4 percent less flab, according to researchers. On top of that, artichokes contain a compound called cynarine, which promotes fat digestion and can serve as a natural diuretic by helping to eliminate water retention.

How to Eat It: When was the last time you ate a whole artichoke? Well, with whole artichokes fresh and in season, now’s a perfect time. Follow blogger Camille Style’s recipe for Grilled Artichokes with Lemon Garlic Aioli. She walks you through how to cut, trim, cook, and dress them with her deliciously simple parsley oil. If you feel the aioli is a little too heavy, sub it out for a plain, full-fat Greek yogurt and combine with roasted, caramelized garlic and fresh lemon juice.


 Onions

Spring foods vidalia onions

The Vidalia Onion earns the title of one of the nation’s most iconic agricultural products, having been discovered accidentally in the state of Georgia and rocketing to popularity. And just like Champagne has to be from France, a Vidalia onion has to be from Georgia. These onions are a rich source of fructooligosaccharides, a cluster of fructose molecules that lead to better gastrointestinal health and improved digestion by stimulating the growth of healthy bacteria and suppressing the growth of harmful ones. Want more ways to improve your gut health?

How to Eat It: Vidalias are so sweet, delicious, and versatile, it’s hard to pick just one recipe to share. For starters, they’re the perfect onion to add to your summer BBQ: lightly coat with canola oil, salt, and pepper and throw on the grill to get some good caramelization before adding to your burger. Looking to indulge a little? Make these Healthy, Baked (not fried!) Onion Rings from How Sweet It Is.


Radishes

Spring foods radish

After a winter of blues and grays, it’s nice to get a little pop of color in your life. Colorful vegetables are key to weight loss, and radishes are no exception. Their red hue is due to anthocyanins, a phytochemical that has been shown to burn fat and reduce the risk of diabetes. They’ve also been shown to reduce cholesterol, insulin resistance, and inflammation. In a Japanese study, rats fed radishes for three weeks showed reduced levels of bad cholesterol and insulin and a boost in good HDL cholesterol.

How to  Eat It: Eat radishes whole as a high-fiber, belly-filling snack, add a layer of slices to a goat cheese toast, use them as a salad garnish, or make them the star of the salad alongside another seasonal veggie, the carrot, in this Ginger Carrot Radish Salad by blogger, Healthy Seasonal Recipes.


Fennel

Spring foods fennel

Shimmy into those cute spring fashions with confidence by adding fennel to your meals. Although it’s known to be a winter veggie, it’s still in peak season during the early spring. Cherished for its licorice-like flavoring, fennel contains a unique blend of phytonutrients—including the flavonoids rutin and quercetin—that make it a powerful antioxidant. These active compounds help to reduce inflammation, and when combined with the fiber that’s already present in fennel, they can help eliminate potentially carcinogenic toxins from the colon to prevent colon cancer.

How to  Eat It: Make its fronds into pesto, and use the rest in raw fennel, apple, and celery salad or roast it up and add it to your creamy mashed potatoes.


Apricots

Spring foods apricot

These sun-like fruits are sure to brighten your day. While dried apricots are a good source of fiber and iron, they’re also more concentrated in sugar—which is why they’re one of the 20 Healthy Foods You Better Eat in Moderation. Pick up some fresh ones during their short season in late spring to load up on vitamin A (a nutrient that helps your skin glow) and potassium. When you don’t have enough of this essential mineral, it can make your body hold onto water, resulting in weight gain. Besides flushing out extra water weight, potassium also keeps your metabolism running high, and is crucial for the digestion of nutrients such as carbohydrates and fat, as well as the absorption of energy from these nutrients.

How to  Eat It: These juicy sweet and tart fruits are such rarities fresh, so allow them to be the star of your dish. Combine them with blueberries to make a fruit crisp, saute them up to make an apricot compote you can serve over ice cream or yogurt, make a batch of apricot jam you can enjoy throughout the summer, or eat them whole with this Roasted Apricots with Ricotta and Honey recipe from Kitchen Repertoire.


Spinach

Spring foods spinach

Spinach might be available year round, but the freshest, most tender spinach is easily obtainable in the spring. We love it because it’s rich in muscle-building protein and iron, satiating fiber and vitamins A, C, and K. It’s truly one of the healthiest greens out there. It also contains powerful appetite-suppressing compounds called thylakoids to keep your bikini body “diet” on track. A recently published long-term study at Lund University in Sweden found that having a drink containing thylakoids before breakfast could significantly reduce cravings and promote weight loss. Add this leafy spring green to your meals liberally throughout your day, and you’ll feel your cravings start to vanish.

How to Eat It: Spinach is undoubtedly one of the most versatile foods out there. Due to its subtle flavor and texture, spinach can be added to many meals undetected. Toss it in your morning smoothies, whip up a lunchtime salad or soup, use it in sauces, pasta dishes, dips, and stir-fries, or sauté for a healthy side dish.


Radicchio

Spring foods radicchio

Radicchio is the small red or purple leaf that comes in ahead about the size of a softball. It’s one of the best dietary sources of polyphenols—powerful micronutrients that serve a role in preventing disease and losing weight. A study in the Journal of Nutrition found that people who consume 650 milligrams a day of polyphenols have a 30 percent chance of living longer than those who consume less than that. A cup of chicory leaves clocks in at about 235 milligrams, so consider adding a little leafy red into your leafy greens.

How to  Eat It: Firm heads of lettuce, like radicchio, take well to the transformative powers of the grill. Halve or quarter the heads and drizzle with olive oil. Grill over high heat until the outer leaves are blackened and wilted, and the center is softened. Serve radicchio drizzled with balsamic. Get the whole recipe for Grilled Radicchio with Fig Balsamic Syrup, Parmigiano, and Honey-Roasted Almonds from A Beautiful Plate.


Fava Beans

Spring foods fava beans

Similar in likeness to edamame, these green legumes come in their own pod. Besides containing a high concentration of thiamin, vitamin K, vitamin B6, selenium, and magnesium, they’re a great source of lean protein with a whopping 10 grams per cup. Protein is essential not only for bulking your biceps; it’s also essentially in increasing feelings of fullness, as well as helping the body retain its muscle while scorching fat to increase your weight loss. For more slim down tips, don’t miss these 30 Fascinating Weight Loss Tricks You Haven’t Tried.

How to  Eat It: Fava beans have a buttery texture and a lovely, nutty flavor, making them a great addition to soups. But when you get them fresh as you would in the spring, they can really shine in a salad, like From the Land We Live On’s Golden Beet and Fava Bean Salad with Fresh Mint and Crumbled Ricotta.


Dandelion Greens

Spring foods dandelion greens

Seeing those orangey yellow dandelions pop up is definitely one of the first signs of spring. But did you know that besides being a bit of a pest in the garden, they also make a great snack? These bitter-sweet spring greens are bursting with fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. They are also a diuretic, which means they can help blast excess weight by helping your body get rid of extra fluids. A recent study found that steaming the greens increased their total antioxidant properties by 67 percent. And studies have found that this plant is protective against obesity as well as depression, fatigue, immune system problems, and even cancer.

How to Eat It: Sub dandelion greens for spinach in salads, soups, smoothies, and quiches, or blend them into a pesto.


Watercress

Spring foods watercress

Don’t be fooled by its diminutive size—this tiny herb is a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals. In fact, it’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet making it our reigning healthiest vegetable. Gram for gram this slightly peppery green contains four times more beta-carotene than an apple, and a whopping 238 percent of your daily recommended dose of vitamin K per 100 grams—two compounds that keep skin dewy and youthful. What’s more, it might help diminish your risk of cancer. Results from a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest daily supplementation of 85 grams of raw watercress (about two cups) could reduce DNA damage linked to cancer by 17 percent.

How to  Eat It: Exposure to heat may inactivate its cancer-fighting compounds, so it’s best to enjoy watercress raw in salads, cold-pressed juices or smoothies, and sandwiches.


Ramps

Spring foods ramps

With a mildly sweet flavor, these wild leeks are loaded with vitamins A and C and taste similar to onions and garlic. Like all variations of onions, ramps are also a great source of chromium—a mineral that helps with the metabolism of fats, carbs, and insulin. What’s more, they can pack up to a gram of satiating fiber a pop.

How to  Eat It: You can eat them raw, make pesto, or add them to eggs (with asparagus!) for an amazingly fresh tasting spring treat. We love them in Katie at the Kitchen Door’s protein- and fiber-packed Quinoa & Cauliflower Cakes with Wild Ramps. Ramp season is quick, so grab them when you see them or else you just might miss them.


Stinging Nettles

Spring foods singing nettles

Contrary to what you might think, the common nettle is more than a pesky, stinging weed. Since ancient times, it has been used as an important source of food, fiber, and nutraceuticals. An abundant spring green, nettles are also a powerful diuretic. This plant has been used for years in the UK as a springtime cleanse to rid the body of toxins after a winter filled with fatty foods.

How to  Eat It: Stinging nettles are best enjoyed as a hot tea for cleansing the liver and ridding the body of excess fluids. By steeping the leaves in water and straining (a French press pot works great for this) you can avoid being stung by the tiny hairs that coat the leaf stems.


Broccoli

Spring foods broccoli

There’s a reason almost every diet includes a hefty dose of broccoli. The green superfood is rich in sulforaphane, a compound that not only increases testosterone and fights off body fat storage but also blocks enzymes linked to joint destruction and inflammation.  If you want to stay lean and active for life, maintaining healthy joints is a must! The green veggies are also rich in vitamin C (a mere cup of the stuff can help you hit your daily mark), a nutrient that can lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which will further aid your toned body efforts.

How to  Eat It: You’ve probably been cooking broccoli since you learned how to whip up a bowl of pasta. And with the global market extending its season year-round, we know there’s no short supply. However, if you can get your hands on this spring-season-grown cruciferous veggie, we’d recommend eating it root-to-leaf, like Sassy Kitchen does in this Shaved Broccoli Stem Salad with Lemon and Pecorino.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

 

The Worst New Year’s Resolutions

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned how that I would be extending blogmas until December 31st. These posts won’t be holiday related as Christmas has since passed (Yesterday) Happy The Day After Christmas. What I will be doing Is adding some New Year’s related content to help you continue to stay on track and I will slowly be adding more of my normal content over the next week or so.

PLEASE READ: I have been thinking that I wanted to do something different for my blog next year and that Is more content that you want to see. I know that at the and of every post I ALWAYS ask what you would like to see. I MEAN I REALLY want to do more content related to what you want to see. It can be “Diet” related, fitness, nutrition or even advice posts. I post what I post because It means something to mean I won’t post something if I didn’t believe in it. I want to take this blog to the next level and I want you all of my followers (friends) to be apart of the ride. So please don’t hesitate in reaching out with any and all suggestions. You can find all of my links at the end of every post in the “Thank You” section and in the section “Where You Can Follow Me”. 

If you have missed #Blogmas all the links are listed in the section titled Blogmas which will be in right under this.

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 25! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 22 Days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-25

*I realized that my #blogmas days had repeated tagged posts and that not every post was linked. I caught the mistake and fixed it. Every link should now be clickable and days 1-18 are now linked. If you are new to #blogmas you can catch up below.

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6 Blogmas Day 7 Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10 Blogmas Day 11 Blogmas Day 12 Blogmas Day 13 Blogmas Day 14  Blogmas Day 15  Blogmas Day 16 Blogmas Day 17 Blogmas Day 18  Blogmas Day 19 Blogmas Day 20 Blogmas Day 21 Blogmas Day 22 Blogmas Day 23 Blogmas Day 24 Blogmas Day 25


Another year “might” mean another failed attempt at seeing New Year’s resolutions all the way through. There are statistics that show only 9.2 percent of people report actually achieving their resolutions. Many many people get easily frustrated with themselves if they don’t fulfill the goals they set during the time frame they have also set, Even if they don’t see immediate results from the efforts they do put in.

It’s possible that the types of resolutions you are making are in fact setting you up for failure. You might just be making the worst resolutions possible. Just think about this: do you really want to achieve an unpractical goal? Or worse—one that benefits you in the short term and then backfires in the long term? It’s time to scratch those plans and start fresh. In today’s post I would consider this list to be the worst New Year’s resolutions you can make for 2019 so you know what to avoid.

Saying, “I want to eat healthier” without really knowing what that means for you.

Woman in kitchen

The problem is that they often do not know exactly what this means, and the resolution is not specific enough. It would be more helpful for an individual to first define what eating healthy is and what it means to them. Next, they should be specific about what changes they plan to make in their diet to ensure they are eating healthier.


 

Having this mindset: “I want to have a body like [insert celebrity name here].”

Woman looking in mirror

It’s easy to set benchmarks for physical beauty by the celebrities we see every day, but trying to look like your favorite celebrity isn’t just misguided, it’s downright unhealthy. Everyone is different, including their genetics, body chemistry, and lifestyle. Celebrities often have certain advantages (physical and financial) that the average person doesn’t have, so many people will be disappointed if their efforts of healthy eating and exercise don’t lead to A-list results.


Deciding That Losing Weight Means Restricting Foods.

Woman craving food

Instead of focusing on the number on the scale and having extreme goals that will create unhealthy outcomes, why don’t you instead focus on behaviors you WANT to change. Perhaps you want to engage more in body movement in the new year or maybe you want to be more mindful of listening to your body cues of hunger (and) fullness and not engaging in mindless eating.


Taking A Ton Of Vitamins In Order To Become Healthier

Vitamins

I hear about how people make resolutions to take large quantities of vitamins in the new year. This is not a good idea for many reasons. First, it never lasts—no one continues taking handfuls of supplements forever because it’s frankly too much and it’s neither pleasant nor good for you. And secondly, it is not good for your health. These handfuls of pills are typically excessive and can, in fact, cause more harm than good. I do advocate a personalized approach to taking the right vitamins based on your “diet”, lifestyle, and health concerns. Doing so, via a personalized multivitamin (only one or two pills daily) is typically the best way to get what you need in safe and doable amounts. It is also much more likely to create a lasting and effective habit that will ultimately give you better health, energy, and ability to improve your overall lifestyle.


Having A Vague Exercise Goal

tired during workout

Saying that you want to start exercising or exercising more is a great resolution to make, but it isn’t specific enough. Sticking to this goal will be difficult if you haven’t first defined what exercise means to you, and how you plan to carry out this resolution. Make a clear and specific resolution that includes the type of exercise, the amount, and the length of time.


Opting For The “Quick” Cosmetic Fix To Get Lean

Woman measuring waist

Liposuction is not a weight-loss tool but a body shaping process. It works best in patients who are at or very close to their normal weight, and have stubborn areas of fat that are out of proportion with the rest of their figure


Starving As A Means Of Cutting Holiday Weight

Hungry woman

All too often, people eat and drink too much from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Eve. People decide to starve themselves beginning Jan. 1 to get rid of the excess weight quickly. This is a terrible resolution because our bodies turn food into energy so we can accomplish the tasks of daily living, including keeping our brains healthy. Without new sources of energy, our bodies rely solely on our stored fat, which turns into ketones, and too many ketones can be unhealthy.

Think About This:

Many people don’t want to hear it, but eating healthy, sensible meals and exercising are the best ways to lose weight year-round. It is not a quick fix, but it’s a long-term solution to live our best, healthiest lives.


Deciding To Quit Smoking “Cold Turkey”

Cigarette

This is another great resolution, but people fail at it because they don’t know the best way to go about quitting. Very often, people attempt to quit “cold turkey” and unfortunately, very few people are successful at this method. What people don’t realize is that the best method to quitting involves a combination of two things: tobacco cessation medications and behavior changes. To increase your chances of successfully quitting smoking, speak with your doctor about medication options, and ask to be referred to a behavioral therapist or seek one out on your own or you can talk to a friend or family member who quit smoking.


Only Exercising Indoors

Weight training

While some exercise is better than none, exercising indoors exclusively can deprive us of exposure to sunlight. Sun exposure helps our bodies synthesize vitamin D, a hormone that is important for bone and tissue health, immunity and other metabolic processes. Exercising outside is a good way to help boost your vitamin D levels in the coming year.


Making Too Many New Year’s Resolutions

Woman stressed

We often put the needs of other people first, so we put off taking the time to make healthy foods, exercise, get enough sleep, relax and other basic needs. To make up for 12 months of not taking care of ourselves, we decide to make the new year the time we are going to get our lives in order…every aspect of our lives. Unfortunately, if we try to do too much and to change too many things at one time, this can set us up to fail at everything.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂