Benefits of Potatoes

Potatoes are a versatile root vegetable and a staple food in many households.

They are an underground tuber that grows on the roots of the Solanum tuberosum plant(Potatoes and human health).

Potatoes are relatively cheap, easy to grow and packed with a variety of nutrients.


Here are 7 health and nutrition benefits of potatoes

 Packed With Nutrients

Roasted Potatoes in Oven Dish

Potatoes are an excellent source of many vitamins and minerals.

One medium baked potato (6.1 ounces or 173 grams), including the skin, provides (Nutrition Facts & Calories):

  • Calories: 161
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Protein: 4.3 grams
  • Carbs: 36.6 grams
  • Fiber: 3.8 grams
  • Vitamin C: 28% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6: 27% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 26% of the RDI
  • Manganese: 19% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 12% of the RDI
  • Phosphorus: 12% of the RDI
  • Niacin: 12% of the RDI
  • Folate: 12% of the RDI

The nutritional content of potatoes can vary depending on the variety and how they are prepared. For example, frying potatoes adds more calories and fat than baking them.

It’s also important to note the skin of the potatoes contains a great amount of the vitamins and minerals. Peeling potatoes can significantly reduce their nutritional content (Potatoes and human health)

Potatoes are packed with vitamins and minerals, though the variety and preparation method can affect the nutritional content.


Contain Antioxidants

Potatoes are rich in compounds like flavonoids, carotenoids and phenolic acids (Antioxidants in potato).

These compounds act as antioxidants in the body by neutralizing potentially harmful molecules known as free radicals. When free radicals accumulate, they can increase the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer (Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress).

For example, a test-tube study found that the antioxidants present in potatoes may suppress the growth of liver and colon cancer cells (proliferation of human colon and liver cancer cells).

Studies have also found that colored potatoes like purple potatoes can have three to four times more antioxidants than white potatoes. This makes them potentially more effective at neutralizing free radicals (Antioxidant Contents and Antioxidant Activities of White and Colored Potatoesflavonoids and phenolic acids ).

However, most of this evidence is from test-tube studies. More human-based research is necessary before making any health recommendations.

Potatoes are a good source of antioxidants, which may reduce the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. However, more human-based research is required before making any recommendations.


Potatoes contain a special type of starch known as resistant starch.

This starch is not broken down and fully absorbed by the body. Instead, it reaches the large intestine where it becomes a source of nutrients for the beneficial bacteria in your gut ( complex carbohydrates in the gut).

Research has linked resistant starch to many health benefits, including reducing insulin resistance, which, in turn, improves blood sugar control.

In an animal study, mice fed resistant starch showed reduced insulin resistance. This means their bodies were more efficient at removing excess sugar from the blood (starch can improve insulin sensitivity ).

A study of people with type 2 diabetes found consuming a meal with resistant starch helped better remove excess blood sugar after a meal (Blood Glucose Regulation).

In another study, ten people were fed 30 grams of resistant starch daily over a four-week period. Scientists found that resistant starch reduced insulin resistance by 33% (Insulin-sensitizing effects of dietary resistant starch).

Interestingly, you can also increase the resistant starch content of potatoes. To do this, store boiled potatoes in the fridge overnight and consume them cold ( cold storage of potatoes lowers postprandial glycaemic).

Potatoes contain resistant starch, which may help reduce insulin resistance. In turn, this can help improve blood sugar control.


May Improve Digestive Health

The resistant starch in potatoes may also improve digestive health.

When resistant starch reaches the large intestine, it becomes food for beneficial gut bacteria. These bacteria digest it and turn it into short-chain fatty acids (human colonic function).

Resistant starch from potatoes is mostly converted into the short-chain fatty acid butyrate — the preferred food source for gut bacteria (human microbiomes to dietary supplementationshort chain fatty acids).

Studies have shown that butyrate can reduce inflammation in the colon, strengthen the colon’s defenses and reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (Potential beneficial effects of butyrate).

Moreover, butyrate may aid patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and diverticulitis (inflammatory bowel diseases).

That said, most of the evidence surrounding butyrate is from test-tube or animal studies. More human-based research is necessary before making recommendations.

Resistant starch in potatoes is a source of nutrition for beneficial gut bacteria. They convert it to the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, which has been linked to reduced inflammation in the colon, improved colon defenses and a lower risk of colorectal cancer.


 Naturally Gluten-Free

The gluten-free “diet” is one of the most popular diets worldwide. It involves eliminating gluten, which is a family of proteins found in grains like spelt, wheat, barley, and rye.

Most people do not experience adverse symptoms from consuming gluten.

However, people with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity can experience severe discomfort when consuming foods that contain gluten. Symptoms include sharp stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation, bloating and skin rashes, just to name a few (Celiac diseaseDiagnosis of gluten related disorders).

If you follow a gluten-free “diet”, then you should consider adding potatoes to your “diet”. They are naturally gluten-free, which means they won’t trigger uncomfortable symptoms.

While potatoes are gluten-free, many common potato recipes are not. Some potato dishes that contain gluten include certain au gratin recipes and potato bread.

If you have celiac disease or a non-celiac gluten sensitivity, be sure to read the full list of ingredients before eating a potato dish.

Potatoes are naturally gluten-free, which makes them an excellent food choice for people with celiac disease or a non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

 Incredibly Filling

Aside from being nutritious, potatoes are also incredibly filling.

In one study, 11 people were fed 38 common foods and asked to rate foods based on how filling they were. Potatoes received the highest fullness rating of them all.

In fact, potatoes were rated as being seven times more filling than croissants, which were ranked as the least filling food item (A satiety index of common foods).

Foods that are filling may help you regulate or lose weight, as they curb hunger pains (Protein, weight management, and satiety).

Some evidence shows that a certain potato protein, known as potato proteinase inhibitor 2 (PI2), can curb appetite. This protein appears to enhance the release of cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone that promotes feelings of fullness (Health-beneficial properties of potatos).

Studies have shown that potatoes are among the most filling foods. They may increase the levels of fullness hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK).


 Extremely Versatile

Not only are potatoes healthy, but they are also delicious and versatile.

Potatoes can be prepared in many ways, including boiled, baked and steamed. However, frying potatoes may dramatically increase their calorie content if you use a lot of oil.

Instead, try slicing potatoes and then roasting them in the oven with a light drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a sprinkle of rosemary.

Make sure not to remove the skin of the potatoes, as most of the nutrients are located there. This will ensure you receive the maximum amount of nutrients from the potato.

Potatoes are delicious, versatile and easy to add to your “diet”. Try boiling, baking or steaming them and consuming them with the skin intact.

Potatoes are rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, which make them very healthy.

Studies have linked potatoes and their nutrients to a variety of impressive health benefits, including improved blood sugar control, reduced heart disease risk and higher immunity. They may also improve digestive health and combat signs of aging.

Potatoes are also quite filling, which means they may help you lose weight by curbing hunger pains and cravings.

All in all, potatoes are a great addition to your “diet” in moderation. They are also naturally gluten-free, which means they can be enjoyed by almost everyone.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

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Is Cassava Flour Bad For You?

Cassava is a root vegetable widely consumed in developing countries. It provides some important nutrients and resistant starch, which may have health benefits.

On the other hand, cassava can have dangerous effects, especially if it is eaten raw and in large amounts.

This article will explore the unique properties of cassava to determine if it’s a healthy and safe food for you to include in your diet.


What Is Cassava?

Cassava is a nutty-flavored, starchy root vegetable or tuber. Native to South America, it’s a major source of calories and carbs for people in developing countries.

It is grown in tropical regions of the world because of its ability to withstand difficult growing conditions — in fact, it’s one of the most drought-tolerant crops (1).

In the United States, cassava is often called yuca and may also be referred to as manioc or Brazilian arrowroot.

The most commonly consumed part of cassava is the root, which is very versatile. It can be eaten whole, grated or ground into flour to make bread and crackers.

Additionally, cassava root is well known as the raw material that’s used to produce tapioca and garri, a product similar to tapioca.

Individuals with food allergies often benefit from using cassava root in cooking and baking because it is gluten-free, grain-free and nut-free.

One important note is that cassava root must be cooked before it is eaten. Raw cassava can be poisonous, which will be discussed in a later chapter.

Cassava is a versatile root vegetable that is consumed in several parts of the world. It must be cooked before it is eaten.


Contains a Few Key Nutrients

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of boiled cassava root contains 112 calories. 98% of these are from carbs and the rest are from a small amount of protein and fat.

This serving also provides fiber, as well as a few vitamins and minerals.

The following nutrients are found in 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of boiled cassava:

  • Calories: 112
  • Carbs: 27 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Thiamine: 20% of the RDI
  • Phosphorus: 5% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 2% of the RDI
  • Riboflavin: 2% of the RDI

Boiled cassava root also contains small amounts of iron, vitamin C and niacin.

Overall, the nutrition profile of cassava is unremarkable. While it does provide some vitamins and minerals, the amounts are minimal.

There are many other root vegetables you can eat that will provide significantly more nutrients — beets and sweet potatoes, to name two.

Cassava is a significant source of carbs and also provides a small amount of fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

This is because many of the vitamins and minerals are destroyed by processing, as well as most of the fiber and resistant starch.

Therefore, the more popular, processed forms of cassava — such as tapioca and garri — have very limited nutritional value.

For example, 1 ounce (28 grams) of tapioca pearls provides nothing but calories and a small amount of a few minerals.

Boiling cassava root is one cooking method that has been shown to retain most nutrients, with the exception of vitamin C, which is sensitive to heat and easily leaches into the water.

While cassava contains several nutrients, processing methods significantly lower its nutritional value by destroying vitamins and minerals.


It’s High in Calories

Cassava contains 112 calories per 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving, which is quite high compared to other root vegetables (Cassava for Use as a Staple Food).

For example, the same serving of sweet potatoes provides 76 calories, and the same amount of beets provides only 44.

This is what makes cassava such an important crop for developing countries since it is a significant source of calories (Nutritional Value of Cassava).

However, its high-calorie count may do more harm than good for the general population.

Consuming high-calorie foods on a regular basis is associated with weight gain and obesity, so consume cassava in moderation and in reasonable portions (Dietary energy density). An appropriate serving size is about 1/3–1/2 cup (73–113 grams).

Cassava contains a significant number of calories, so consume it in moderation and in appropriate portion sizes.

High in Resistant Starch

Cassava is high in resistant starch, a type of starch that bypasses digestion and has properties similar to soluble fiber.

Consuming foods that are high in resistant starch may have several benefits for overall health.

First of all, resistant starch feeds the beneficial bacteria in your gut, which may help reduce inflammation and promote digestive health (Resistant Starch: Promise for Improving Human HealthRole of resistant starch ).

Resistant starch has also been studied for its ability to contribute to better metabolic health and reduce the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

This is due to its potential to improve blood sugar control, in addition to its role in promoting fullness and reducing appetite (Acute ingestion of resistant starchimproving human healthmetabolic effects and potential health benefitsStarches, Sugars and Obesity).

The benefits of resistant starch are promising, but it is important to note that many processing methods may lower cassava’s resistant starch content.

Products made from cassava, such as flour, tend to be lower in resistant starch than cassava root that has been cooked and then cooled in its whole form (The resistant starchResistant starch in cassava products).

Cassava in its whole form is high in resistant starch, which is known for its role in preventing certain metabolic conditions and promoting gut health.

Contains Antinutrients

One of cassava’s major downfalls is its content of antinutrients.

Antinutrients are plant compounds that may interfere with digestion and inhibit the absorption of vitamins and minerals in the body.

These aren’t a concern for most healthy people, but their effects are important to keep in mind.

They are more likely to impact populations at risk of malnutrition. Interestingly, this includes populations that rely on cassava as a staple food.


Here are the most important antinutrients found in cassava:

The effects of antinutrients are more prominent when they are consumed frequently and as part of a nutritionally inadequate diet.

As long as you only consume cassava on occasion, the antinutrients shouldn’t be a major cause for concern.

In fact, under some circumstances, antinutrients such as tannins and saponins may actually have beneficial health effects (ProanthocyanidinsSaponins as cytotoxic agentsEffects of Saponins on Lipid Metabolism).

The antinutrients in cassava may interfere with the absorption of some vitamins and minerals and may cause digestive distress. This is mainly a concern for populations that rely on cassava as a staple food.


May Have Dangerous Effects in Some Circumstances

Cassava may be dangerous if consumed raw, in large amounts or when it is prepared improperly.

This is because raw cassava contains chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, which can release cyanide in the body when consumed.

When eaten frequently, these increase the risk of cyanide poisoning, which may impair thyroid and nerve function. It is associated with paralysis and organ damage and can be fatal (The toxic effects of cassava).

Those who have an overall poor nutrition status and low protein intake are more likely to experience these effects since protein helps rid the body of cyanide (Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide).

This is why cyanide poisoning from cassava is a greater concern for those who live in developing countries. Many people in these countries suffer from protein deficiencies and depend on cassava as a major source of calories (Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide in cassava).

What’s more, in some areas of the world, cassava has been shown to absorb harmful chemicals from the soil, such as arsenic and cadmium. This may increase the risk of cancer in those who depend on cassava as a staple food (Cancer and non-cancer health risk from eating cassava).

Frequent consumption of cassava is associated with cyanide poisoning, especially if it is consumed raw and prepared improperly.


How to Make Cassava Safer for Consumption

Cassava is generally safe when it is prepared properly and eaten occasionally in moderate amounts. A reasonable serving size is about 1/3–1/2 cup.

Here are some ways you can make cassava safer for consumption cassava,Cassava Processing):

  • Peel it: The peel of cassava root contains most of the cyanide-producing compounds.
  • Soak it: Soaking cassava by submerging it in water for 48–60 hours before it is cooked and eaten may reduce the amount of harmful chemicals it contains.
  • Cook it: Since the harmful chemicals are found in raw cassava, it’s essential to cook it thoroughly — by boiling, roasting or baking, for example.
  • Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanide Chronic poisoning by hydrogen cyanidePair it with protein: Eating some protein along with cassava may be beneficial since protein helps rid the body of toxic cyanide
  • Maintain a balanced diet: You can prevent adverse effects from cassava by including a variety of foods in your diet and not relying on it as your sole source of nutrition.

It’s important to note that products made from cassava root, such as cassava flour and tapioca, contain extremely little to no cyanide-inducing compounds and are safe for human consumption.

You can make cassava safer for consumption with several strategies, including using certain preparation methods and consuming it in reasonable portions.


How to Use Cassava

There are many ways you can incorporate cassava into your diet.

You can prepare several snacks and dishes with the root on its own. It is commonly sliced and then baked or roasted, similar to the way you would prepare a potato.

Additionally, cassava root can be mashed or mixed in with stir-fries, omelets, and soups. It’s also sometimes ground into flour and used in bread and crackers.

You can also enjoy it in the form of tapioca, which is a starch extracted from the cassava root through a process of washing and pulping.

Tapioca is commonly used as a thickener for puddings, pies, and soups.

Cassava is typically used in the same way that you would use potatoes and makes an excellent addition to just about any dish. It can also be ground into flour or enjoyed in the form of tapioca.

Cassava contains some healthful properties, but its negative effects appear to outweigh the benefits.

Not only is it high in calories and antinutrients — it can cause cyanide poisoning when prepared improperly or consumed in large amounts.

While this is mostly a concern for those who rely on cassava as a staple food, it is still important to keep in mind.

Additionally, cassava-based products like tapioca have been processed enough to remove toxic chemicals and are not dangerous to consume.

Overall, cassava is not a food that needs to be a regular part of your diet. If you do eat it, prepare it properly and eat it in reasonable portions.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

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Most Popular Fruits In America

Ladies and Gentlemen, I can’t believe that I forgot to post yesterday my streak has ended at 9 months (insert sad face). I’ll be honest It did slip my mind because I have been doing home Improvements or a.k.a my days are spent In a Lowe’s or Homedepot and the nights are spent doing those said home Improvements. So with that being said the most popular fruits In America is going up today and saturday, I will do two blog posts to catch up.

Fruits are an important part of the human diet. They contain vitamins and other nutrients that help keep the body healthy. Because of their nutritional benefits, fruit consumption has grown over the years. The consumption of fruits varies in different parts of the world with some fruits being consumed around the world while some being restricted to certain areas because of their limited availability. Some of the fruits that are most consumed in the world are as discussed below.


Most Popular Fruits of the World

Tomatoes

Although tomatoes are considered as a vegetable in culinary communities, by botanical/scientific descriptors of fruits and vegetables, tomatoes are classified as a fruit. By that description, tomatoes hold the title for the world’s most consumed fruit! In fact, tomatoes are considered a must-have in most households around the world. The annual production of tomatoes stands at 170.75 million metric tons. Tomatoes are produced through normal farming, but mostly through irrigation and greenhouses. Tomatoes can be consumed raw or cooked. In addition, several metric tons of tomatoes are processed to form sauces, most of which are used to make pizzas and pasta.


Bananas

Banana is almost everyone’s darling across the world. The annual consumption of bananas stands at 114.13 million metric tons. They are mostly consumed ripe in most parts of the world. However, raw bananas are also cooked in some parts of the world. Bananas are also used to make flavors that are used to bake cakes. They are a preferred fruit because of their availability all year round and their high nutritional value.


Watermelons

Annual consumption of watermelon in the world is at 111 million metric tons. Watermelons are readily available in most parts of the world, even in dry area where most fruits would not thrive. Watermelons grow well in mild conditions and only take a few months to mature. Besides, as cultivating watermelon is less labor intensive than other fruits, farmers prefer it over other crops. The watermelon’s sweetness and nutritional value make it among the most preferred fruits.


Apples

An apple a day keeps the doctor away, they say. Apple is the fourth most consumed fruit in the world with an annual consumption of approximately 84.63 million metric tons. Apples are not produced in most parts of the world. However, the top world’s producers like China, the US, Turkey, and Poland export their surplus production to the countries whose production cannot sustain the consumption demand. Apples are preferred for their nutritional value. They can be consumed raw or cooked, or as apple juice. Apples are also good antioxidants.


Grapefruits

Grapefruits are the fifth most consumed fruit in the world. The annual world’s consumption of grapefruits stands at 83.97 million metric tons. The nutritional value of grapefruit makes it among the topmost consumed fruits. It is rich in vitamin C. Besides nutritional value, grapefruits are also consumed in most parts of the world due to their medicinal properties. Grapefruit can be consumed as a fruit or as a juice.


Top Producers and Exporters of Fruits

Other fruits that are consumed widely around the world include grapes, oranges, mangoes, and pineapples. In 2014, Asia produced over 370 million metric tons of fruits, making it the leading global fruit supplier. Africa, South America, and Europe produced 90 million, 79 million, and 73 million metric tons respectively. Some of the top fruit exporters include Netherlands, Guatemala, South Africa, Spain, Ecuador, Costa Rica, the US, and Mexico.


The Most Popular Fruit in the World

In A Chart

Rank Fruit Produced Million Metric Tons
1 Tomatoes 170.75
2 Bananas 114.13
3 Watermelons 111
4 Apples 84.63
5 Grapefruit 83.97
6 Grapes 74.5
7 Oranges 70.86
8 Mangoes 45.23
9 Plantains 30.67
10 Tangerines 29.87
11 Pears 25.8
12 Pineapples

Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

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Springtime Health

Before I start today’s post I just want to say congratulations to the Superbowl champs New England Patriots!!!!!!!!!!!

Spring Is 24 days away. With the change of season comes the impulse to clean and replace the old with the new. But spring doesn’t just have to be about cleaning and reorganizing – it’s also a great way to start healthy new habits and break the old. Here are a few tips to get a head start in your spring health!

Always speak with your doctor before making any changes to your diet or exercise regimen.  

Here Are Some Ways That You Can Spring Into Health

 

Start an Exercise Routine – The weather is warm and the days are longer which makes it a perfect combination to get active outside. The American Heart Association recommends that individuals do moderate exercise for at least 150 minutes per week, or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise.

  1. Revamp Your Diet with Fresh Fruits and Vegetables – Take advantage of the variety of vegetables available during spring. A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Try to eat about 3 to 5 servings every day. Fruit is also a good source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. You should try to eat about 2 to 3 servings of fruit each day. It goes without being said that it’s OK to indulge in the occasional ice cream cone. Although, frozen yogurt would be a healthier alternative.
  2. Drink More Water – As the heat kicks into high gear it is harder to stay hydrated and more important to drink more water . Drink plenty of water before going outside and have plenty on-hand to stay hydrated. If you aren’t a fan of water, try one of our recipes for Cucumber Water—it makes a great party beverage for those hot days!
  3. Cut Out the Night Cap – If one of your habits is having a drink before bed, or having a few at dinner, you may want to reconsider your next glass of Merlot. Alcohol not only causes dehydration but is also associated with sleep disorders, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer. It is recommended that women limit themselves to one drink per day, and men up to two alcoholic beverages each day.
  4. Check-In for a Check-Up – You may have chalked up some symptoms and illnesses to the winter blues, but now that it is spring, its time to get back to the doctor for a head-to-toe check up! A periodic well-exam for all ages is not just about good medical care, but it also gives you the opportunity to learn more about beneficial health habits, counseling and community support services as well as an overall view of the best ways to take care of yourself and your family for a lifetime. Your doctor will let you know how often they need to test for high blood pressure, diabetes, other diseases, and cancer screenings.
  5. Protect Your Skin – It’s going to get hot, the sun is shining, and your skin needs protection. Not only do men and women need to regularly moisturize their skin, but also protect it from the harsh rays of the sun. If you’re outside, make sure to use a sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher that protects against UVA and UVB rays. It doesn’t hurt to throw on a pair of sunglasses and a hat as well!
  6. Renew Relationships – It’s time to get out of the house and visit with your friends and family. Research has shown that good, strong relationships benefit your overall health and happiness. Spend the day with people you love, and schedule regular outings to enjoy the great spring weather.


 Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section. If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Bloglovin’ :Amanda Explains It

Bumble Bizz: Amanda

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

The Difference Between White Eggs And Brown Eggs

Happy New Year!

Blogmas is officially over. If you missed the first 31 days here are all the links to the month-long blogmas.

I just want to take a moment before I get into today’s post to wish everyone A Happy New Year’s Eve. I also want to take a moment and say thank you to every and each one of you for being on this journey with me. I set out to blog every single day and I have. For 2019 I want to include all of you (my followers) (read below). I hope you all have fun and let’s have fun. Remember to have fun but also drink responsibly.

HAPPY NEW YEAR AND I WILL SEE YOU ALL IN THE NEW YEAR!

PLEASE READ: I have been thinking that I wanted to do something different for my blog next year and that Is more content that you want to see. I know that at the and of every post I ALWAYS ask what you would like to see. I MEAN I REALLY want to do more content related to what you want to see. It can be “Diet” related, fitness, nutrition or even advice posts. I post what I post because It means something to mean I won’t post something if I didn’t believe in it. I want to take this blog to the next level and I want you all of my followers (friends) to be apart of the ride. So please don’t hesitate in reaching out with any and all suggestions. You can find all of my links at the end of every post in the “Thank You” section and in the section “Where You Can Follow Me”. 

If you have missed #Blogmas all the links are listed in the section titled Blogmas which will be in right under this.

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 31! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 31 Days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-31

*I realized that my #blogmas days had repeated tagged posts and that not every post was linked. I caught the mistake and fixed it. Every link should now be clickable and days 1-18 are now linked. If you are new to #blogmas you can catch up below.

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6 Blogmas Day 7 Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10 Blogmas Day 11 Blogmas Day 12 Blogmas Day 13 Blogmas Day 14  Blogmas Day 15  Blogmas Day 16 Blogmas Day 17 Blogmas Day 18  Blogmas Day 19 Blogmas Day 20 Blogmas Day 21 Blogmas Day 22 Blogmas Day 23 Blogmas Day 24 Blogmas Day 25 Blogmas Day 26 Blogmas Day 27 Blogmas Day 28 Blogmas Day 29 Blogmas Day 30 Blogmas Day 31


When shopping for eggs, it’s inevitable to notice that the brown eggs almost always cost more than the white. Some may think that one is better than the other, but the truth is they’re not very different at all. There is a difference between brown eggs and white eggs, but it might not be all it’s cracked up to be. Let me eggsplain (lol).


What’s The Difference Between Brown Eggs And White Eggs

Eggshells get their color due to the breed of chicken they come from. For example, breeders have found that many white-feathered chickens with white earlobes lay white eggs, and red-feathered chickens with red earlobes lay brown eggs. While earlobe color can be a predictor of egg color, it is not always the rule.

For example, one breed of red-earlobed chickens—called the Aracuana breed—often lays blue eggs, but may also lay eggs that are green, pink, or even lavender, according to nonprofit organization Aviculture Europe.


Why Are Brown Eggs More Expensive Than White Eggs

Because brown eggs tend to cost more, people assume they are more nutritious and more delicious. But that is not the case. Brown eggs are more expensive because of the size of the hen that lays them. Red-feathered chickens tend to weigh more than white-feathered chickens. Because larger chickens require more food and land to remain healthy throughout production, higher production costs lead to more expensive products in the end when you’re shopping for eggs in the grocery store.

Some people also think that one color shell is harder than the other, or that there are different colored yolks. These factors are due to the age and feed of the chicken. The coloring of shells or bird has nothing to do with this.

Whether you prefer to eat eggs scrambled and fluffy, runny atop a slice of avocado toast, hard boiled in a salad, or fried on top of a burger (trust me on that one), you can’t go wrong when picking between brown eggs and white eggs.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

 

How To Shed Winter Weight In The Spring

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned how that I would be extending blogmas until December 31st. These posts won’t be holiday related as Christmas has since passed (Yesterday) Happy The Day After Christmas. What I will be doing Is adding some New Year’s related content to help you continue to stay on track and I will slowly be adding more of my normal content over the next week or so.

PLEASE READ: I have been thinking that I wanted to do something different for my blog next year and that Is more content that you want to see. I know that at the and of every post I ALWAYS ask what you would like to see. I MEAN I REALLY want to do more content related to what you want to see. It can be “Diet” related, fitness, nutrition or even advice posts. I post what I post because It means something to mean I won’t post something if I didn’t believe in it. I want to take this blog to the next level and I want you all of my followers (friends) to be apart of the ride. So please don’t hesitate in reaching out with any and all suggestions. You can find all of my links at the end of every post in the “Thank You” section and in the section “Where You Can Follow Me”. 

If you have missed #Blogmas all the links are listed in the section titled Blogmas which will be in right under this.

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 25! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 22 Days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-25

*I realized that my #blogmas days had repeated tagged posts and that not every post was linked. I caught the mistake and fixed it. Every link should now be clickable and days 1-18 are now linked. If you are new to #blogmas you can catch up below.

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6 Blogmas Day 7 Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10 Blogmas Day 11 Blogmas Day 12 Blogmas Day 13 Blogmas Day 14  Blogmas Day 15  Blogmas Day 16 Blogmas Day 17 Blogmas Day 18  Blogmas Day 19 Blogmas Day 20 Blogmas Day 21 Blogmas Day 22 Blogmas Day 23 Blogmas Day 24 Blogmas Day 25 Blogmas Day 26


If the thought of coming out from beneath your baggy cold-weather sweaters is making you break out in a cold sweat, relax! You still have plenty of time to lose weight and look your best before sundress season arrives. Spring is actually the best season to find foods that are packed with the weight-loss-super star, fiber. This macronutrient helps fill you up, can clean you out, and makes achieving your weight loss goals a whole lot easier. What’s more, these particular foods are also bursting with micronutrients that help turn off your fat-storage genes, leading to even more rapid, sustainable weight loss.

When you eat foods that are in season, they’re not only more affordable, but they’re also fresher and packed with the highest amount of flavor and nutritional value. We’ve compiled a list of 20 fruits and veggies that are in peak season every spring—they’re all easy to find, too! Since many of them will only be on sale for a few weeks of the season, you better act fast.

So, say goodbye to stews and slow cookers and start blasting away those extra winter pounds with these spring foods. To help you incorporate them into your diet, I’ve also included some bloggers favorite recipes and ways to enjoy them.

Fiddlehead Ferns

Spring foods fiddlehead ferns

These delicate spirals are the furled fronds of a young fern, which is why they are only around for a few weeks in early spring. They’re packed with manganese, vitamin C, vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids, and fiber, which inhibits the release of the hunger hormone ghrelin, helping you to minimize munching. And if you thought bananas were the potassium powerhouse, then you’ll be interested to know these give the yellow fruit a run for its money. Fiddleheads actually have more of the bloat-banishing mineral per gram than bananas, which can also help lower blood pressure and protect against heart attack and stroke.

How to Eat It: Clean the veggie by removing any of the papery outer coatings; then soak it briefly in a bath of cold water with a bit of lemon and salt. Drain and then steam them for four or five minutes. Add the steamed fiddleheads to a skillet with a couple of tablespoons of unsalted butter and cook on each side for a minute or two. They’ll turn golden like asparagus. Add salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Rhubarb

Spring foods rhubarb

This plant might look like red-hued celery, but if you’ve ever been adventurous enough to cook with it, you know that this vegetable is much more flavorful than its vibrant twin. Tart rhubarb loves to partner with fruit to become a sweet treat. (Just don’t eat the leaves—they’re poisonous!) Rhubarb is high in catechins, the same compound that gives green tea its belly-fat fighting properties. Catechins blast adipose tissue by triggering the release of fat from fat cells (particularly in the belly) and then speed up the liver’s capacity for turning that fat into energy.

How to  Eat It: Wash, dry, and trim the stalk at the root and leaves. Cut a slit under the edge of the rhubarb skin at one end and pull down the remove the stringy fibers, similar to what you would do with celery. Cut stalks into 2-inch pieces, toss with cinnamon, honey, lemon zest, and vanilla extract and roast in a 350-degree oven until the rhubarb is tender, about 30 minutes. Serve on top of some full-fat Greek yogurt and top with crunchy pistachios.


 Mushrooms

Spring foods morel mushroomsThese mushrooms are the third highest vegetable source of vitamin D (only behind two other mushrooms), serving you 23 percent of your daily value in a single cup. This vitamin has many biological functions beyond its classic role in bone metabolism, one of which is regulating your immune system. One study found that when vitamin D concentrations were low in a group of runners had a biomarker for increased inflammation. When your body is in a state of chronic inflammation, it can lead to clogged arteries, worsened insulin resistance, and even weight gain. So besides climbing out of that cold, dreary hole that you dug yourself into this winter and catching some Vitamin-D-producing rays, make sure to grab some morel mushrooms!

How to  Eat It: These wild mushrooms are prized for their smoky, nutty flavor, which pairs well with Parmesan in a risotto. First, because of their folds and ridges, they’ll need to be washed under cool water and scrubbed thoroughly. Sautée them up with olive oil, a little butter, and chopped garlic until golden brown. Season with salt, pepper, fresh thyme, and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Throw on top of risotto, like this one from Pinch of Yum, with freshly grated parmesan and some lemon zest.


Asparagus

Spring foods asparagus

The ultimate spring vegetable, asparagus is rich in potassium and low in sodium, which helps your body achieve proper electrolyte balance and works to reduce bloating. Add the plant’s anti-inflammatory phytonutrients and health-promoting antioxidants—like glutathione, a detoxifying compound that helps break down carcinogens and other harmful free radicals—and you’ve got yourself a powerful weight-loss arrow in your quiver.

How to  Eat It: You probably already know that these delicious veggies don’t need much to make them taste great, but feel free to shake things up a bit with a quick vinaigrette. Whisk together olive oil, lemon zest, dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, and minced garlic. Pour half the vinaigrette over the spears and grill until tender. Once cooked, plate and drizzle the rest of the vinaigrette on top.


Red Leaf Lettuce

Spring foods red leaf lettuce

One serving of red leaf lettuce is only 14 calories, but it’s bursting with fiber. It’s one of the world’s greatest weight loss foods because it will fill you up and keep you feeling full for hours after you eat it. Even better, two generous cups of lettuce provide 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement for strong, healthy bones. A report from the Nurses’ Health Study suggests that women who eat a serving of lettuce every day cut the risk of hip fracture by 30 percent than when compared with eating just one serving a week.

How to  Eat It: Create a simple vinaigrette with red wine vinegar, dijon mustard, olive oil, minced shallots, a touch of honey, salt, and pepper. Combine roughly chopped red leaf lettuce with arugula, another spring lettuce, and top with spring veggies like roasted beets, orange slices, and walnuts.


Peas

Spring foods peas

You may have pushed them around your plate as a kid, but we’re hoping that stopped when you learned of their anti-aging, immune-strengthening, and energy-boosting antioxidants. Besides teeming with carotenoids and polyphenols, these little green poppers contain a hefty 7 grams of hunger-quelling fiber and 8 grams of muscle-building protein per cup!

How to Eat It: To elevate the humble pea, saute up some crispy prosciutto. Add some finely chopped white onion and a bit of minced garlic. Once tender, add in your peas, and a little bit of chicken stock, and simmer until peas are tender. Add back in the prosciutto, chopped fresh parsley, and mint, and toss it all together with your favorite pasta and freshly grated parmesan.


Artichokes

Spring foods artichokes

Unfortunately, a hefty, creamy artichoke dip will never make it onto any diet-friendly list, but one of its main ingredients does! One medium artichoke boasts an impressive 10.3 grams of fiber, including inulin, a prebiotic soluble fiber that helps promote the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria. Incorporating it into your diet may also aid weight loss efforts—for every 10 grams of fiber you eat daily, your middle will carry almost 4 percent less flab, according to researchers. On top of that, artichokes contain a compound called cynarine, which promotes fat digestion and can serve as a natural diuretic by helping to eliminate water retention.

How to Eat It: When was the last time you ate a whole artichoke? Well, with whole artichokes fresh and in season, now’s a perfect time. Follow blogger Camille Style’s recipe for Grilled Artichokes with Lemon Garlic Aioli. She walks you through how to cut, trim, cook, and dress them with her deliciously simple parsley oil. If you feel the aioli is a little too heavy, sub it out for a plain, full-fat Greek yogurt and combine with roasted, caramelized garlic and fresh lemon juice.


 Onions

Spring foods vidalia onions

The Vidalia Onion earns the title of one of the nation’s most iconic agricultural products, having been discovered accidentally in the state of Georgia and rocketing to popularity. And just like Champagne has to be from France, a Vidalia onion has to be from Georgia. These onions are a rich source of fructooligosaccharides, a cluster of fructose molecules that lead to better gastrointestinal health and improved digestion by stimulating the growth of healthy bacteria and suppressing the growth of harmful ones. Want more ways to improve your gut health?

How to Eat It: Vidalias are so sweet, delicious, and versatile, it’s hard to pick just one recipe to share. For starters, they’re the perfect onion to add to your summer BBQ: lightly coat with canola oil, salt, and pepper and throw on the grill to get some good caramelization before adding to your burger. Looking to indulge a little? Make these Healthy, Baked (not fried!) Onion Rings from How Sweet It Is.


Radishes

Spring foods radish

After a winter of blues and grays, it’s nice to get a little pop of color in your life. Colorful vegetables are key to weight loss, and radishes are no exception. Their red hue is due to anthocyanins, a phytochemical that has been shown to burn fat and reduce the risk of diabetes. They’ve also been shown to reduce cholesterol, insulin resistance, and inflammation. In a Japanese study, rats fed radishes for three weeks showed reduced levels of bad cholesterol and insulin and a boost in good HDL cholesterol.

How to  Eat It: Eat radishes whole as a high-fiber, belly-filling snack, add a layer of slices to a goat cheese toast, use them as a salad garnish, or make them the star of the salad alongside another seasonal veggie, the carrot, in this Ginger Carrot Radish Salad by blogger, Healthy Seasonal Recipes.


Fennel

Spring foods fennel

Shimmy into those cute spring fashions with confidence by adding fennel to your meals. Although it’s known to be a winter veggie, it’s still in peak season during the early spring. Cherished for its licorice-like flavoring, fennel contains a unique blend of phytonutrients—including the flavonoids rutin and quercetin—that make it a powerful antioxidant. These active compounds help to reduce inflammation, and when combined with the fiber that’s already present in fennel, they can help eliminate potentially carcinogenic toxins from the colon to prevent colon cancer.

How to  Eat It: Make its fronds into pesto, and use the rest in raw fennel, apple, and celery salad or roast it up and add it to your creamy mashed potatoes.


Apricots

Spring foods apricot

These sun-like fruits are sure to brighten your day. While dried apricots are a good source of fiber and iron, they’re also more concentrated in sugar—which is why they’re one of the 20 Healthy Foods You Better Eat in Moderation. Pick up some fresh ones during their short season in late spring to load up on vitamin A (a nutrient that helps your skin glow) and potassium. When you don’t have enough of this essential mineral, it can make your body hold onto water, resulting in weight gain. Besides flushing out extra water weight, potassium also keeps your metabolism running high, and is crucial for the digestion of nutrients such as carbohydrates and fat, as well as the absorption of energy from these nutrients.

How to  Eat It: These juicy sweet and tart fruits are such rarities fresh, so allow them to be the star of your dish. Combine them with blueberries to make a fruit crisp, saute them up to make an apricot compote you can serve over ice cream or yogurt, make a batch of apricot jam you can enjoy throughout the summer, or eat them whole with this Roasted Apricots with Ricotta and Honey recipe from Kitchen Repertoire.


Spinach

Spring foods spinach

Spinach might be available year round, but the freshest, most tender spinach is easily obtainable in the spring. We love it because it’s rich in muscle-building protein and iron, satiating fiber and vitamins A, C, and K. It’s truly one of the healthiest greens out there. It also contains powerful appetite-suppressing compounds called thylakoids to keep your bikini body “diet” on track. A recently published long-term study at Lund University in Sweden found that having a drink containing thylakoids before breakfast could significantly reduce cravings and promote weight loss. Add this leafy spring green to your meals liberally throughout your day, and you’ll feel your cravings start to vanish.

How to Eat It: Spinach is undoubtedly one of the most versatile foods out there. Due to its subtle flavor and texture, spinach can be added to many meals undetected. Toss it in your morning smoothies, whip up a lunchtime salad or soup, use it in sauces, pasta dishes, dips, and stir-fries, or sauté for a healthy side dish.


Radicchio

Spring foods radicchio

Radicchio is the small red or purple leaf that comes in ahead about the size of a softball. It’s one of the best dietary sources of polyphenols—powerful micronutrients that serve a role in preventing disease and losing weight. A study in the Journal of Nutrition found that people who consume 650 milligrams a day of polyphenols have a 30 percent chance of living longer than those who consume less than that. A cup of chicory leaves clocks in at about 235 milligrams, so consider adding a little leafy red into your leafy greens.

How to  Eat It: Firm heads of lettuce, like radicchio, take well to the transformative powers of the grill. Halve or quarter the heads and drizzle with olive oil. Grill over high heat until the outer leaves are blackened and wilted, and the center is softened. Serve radicchio drizzled with balsamic. Get the whole recipe for Grilled Radicchio with Fig Balsamic Syrup, Parmigiano, and Honey-Roasted Almonds from A Beautiful Plate.


Fava Beans

Spring foods fava beans

Similar in likeness to edamame, these green legumes come in their own pod. Besides containing a high concentration of thiamin, vitamin K, vitamin B6, selenium, and magnesium, they’re a great source of lean protein with a whopping 10 grams per cup. Protein is essential not only for bulking your biceps; it’s also essentially in increasing feelings of fullness, as well as helping the body retain its muscle while scorching fat to increase your weight loss. For more slim down tips, don’t miss these 30 Fascinating Weight Loss Tricks You Haven’t Tried.

How to  Eat It: Fava beans have a buttery texture and a lovely, nutty flavor, making them a great addition to soups. But when you get them fresh as you would in the spring, they can really shine in a salad, like From the Land We Live On’s Golden Beet and Fava Bean Salad with Fresh Mint and Crumbled Ricotta.


Dandelion Greens

Spring foods dandelion greens

Seeing those orangey yellow dandelions pop up is definitely one of the first signs of spring. But did you know that besides being a bit of a pest in the garden, they also make a great snack? These bitter-sweet spring greens are bursting with fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. They are also a diuretic, which means they can help blast excess weight by helping your body get rid of extra fluids. A recent study found that steaming the greens increased their total antioxidant properties by 67 percent. And studies have found that this plant is protective against obesity as well as depression, fatigue, immune system problems, and even cancer.

How to Eat It: Sub dandelion greens for spinach in salads, soups, smoothies, and quiches, or blend them into a pesto.


Watercress

Spring foods watercress

Don’t be fooled by its diminutive size—this tiny herb is a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals. In fact, it’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet making it our reigning healthiest vegetable. Gram for gram this slightly peppery green contains four times more beta-carotene than an apple, and a whopping 238 percent of your daily recommended dose of vitamin K per 100 grams—two compounds that keep skin dewy and youthful. What’s more, it might help diminish your risk of cancer. Results from a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest daily supplementation of 85 grams of raw watercress (about two cups) could reduce DNA damage linked to cancer by 17 percent.

How to  Eat It: Exposure to heat may inactivate its cancer-fighting compounds, so it’s best to enjoy watercress raw in salads, cold-pressed juices or smoothies, and sandwiches.


Ramps

Spring foods ramps

With a mildly sweet flavor, these wild leeks are loaded with vitamins A and C and taste similar to onions and garlic. Like all variations of onions, ramps are also a great source of chromium—a mineral that helps with the metabolism of fats, carbs, and insulin. What’s more, they can pack up to a gram of satiating fiber a pop.

How to  Eat It: You can eat them raw, make pesto, or add them to eggs (with asparagus!) for an amazingly fresh tasting spring treat. We love them in Katie at the Kitchen Door’s protein- and fiber-packed Quinoa & Cauliflower Cakes with Wild Ramps. Ramp season is quick, so grab them when you see them or else you just might miss them.


Stinging Nettles

Spring foods singing nettles

Contrary to what you might think, the common nettle is more than a pesky, stinging weed. Since ancient times, it has been used as an important source of food, fiber, and nutraceuticals. An abundant spring green, nettles are also a powerful diuretic. This plant has been used for years in the UK as a springtime cleanse to rid the body of toxins after a winter filled with fatty foods.

How to  Eat It: Stinging nettles are best enjoyed as a hot tea for cleansing the liver and ridding the body of excess fluids. By steeping the leaves in water and straining (a French press pot works great for this) you can avoid being stung by the tiny hairs that coat the leaf stems.


Broccoli

Spring foods broccoli

There’s a reason almost every diet includes a hefty dose of broccoli. The green superfood is rich in sulforaphane, a compound that not only increases testosterone and fights off body fat storage but also blocks enzymes linked to joint destruction and inflammation.  If you want to stay lean and active for life, maintaining healthy joints is a must! The green veggies are also rich in vitamin C (a mere cup of the stuff can help you hit your daily mark), a nutrient that can lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which will further aid your toned body efforts.

How to  Eat It: You’ve probably been cooking broccoli since you learned how to whip up a bowl of pasta. And with the global market extending its season year-round, we know there’s no short supply. However, if you can get your hands on this spring-season-grown cruciferous veggie, we’d recommend eating it root-to-leaf, like Sassy Kitchen does in this Shaved Broccoli Stem Salad with Lemon and Pecorino.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

 

 

Holiday Kombucha

Welcome back for #Blogmas Day 12! Blogmas Is flying right by! To catch up here are the links to the first 11 days of #Blogmas

Blogmas Days 1-11

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6  Blogmas Day 7  Blogmas Day 8 Blogmas Day 9 Blogmas Day 10  Blogmas Day 11


There’s a lot to look forward to around the holiday season, like celebrating with loved ones, reveling in cozy sweater weather, and indulging in pumpkin- and peppermint-flavored everything. But why is it that I never associate celebration or indulgence with our health? Yes, you can still be festive and make smart decisions for your health over the holidays. The most fun way to get into the holiday spirit? Sipping on Health-Ade’s new Holiday Cheers Kombucha.

I totally get that it’s the time of year for Holiday Cookies, indulgent treats, hearty meals, and more holiday parties than you can count. After all, the most wonderful time of the year only comes around, well, once a year. However, being mindful of the treats we’re feeding our bodies should be something we practice year-round, not something we push off until January, so why not start at the holiday table?


First Off, What Is Kombucha?

Kombucha is definitely one of those buzzwords you’ve heard floating around recently, or you’ve probably seen it all over Instagram on foodie, wellness, health, and accounts. To the naked eye, the fizzy drink looks a lot like some sort of soda/alcohol hybrid, but kombucha is neither soda nor a cocktail. It is, however, a carbonated beverage, and it does contain a small percentage of alcohol (most brands have less than 0.5% ABV so they can still be sold on shelves as non-alcoholic drinks). Basically, ‘booch is just as tasty as the other beverages you love, but with an added bonus: One serving is incredibly beneficial to your gut.


What Are The Health Benefits Of Kombucha?

Kombucha is a fermented tea made with SCOBY, aka symbiotic cultures of bacteria and yeast, the beverage is swarming with healthy probiotics, plus antioxidants and polyphenols. (Probiotics) help you control harmful bacteria while increasing the production of certain vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin K, B12, B5, and biotin. As a result, probiotics can improve digestive health, decrease inflammation, boost immunity, and in some cases, may even aid in weight loss.


The Newest Health-Ade Kombucha Flavor Is Perfect For The Holidays

There’s an array of brands and flavors of ‘booch to choose from, but if you’re looking to add a healthier twist to your celebratory sips, you’ll want to try Health-Ade’s Holiday Cheers limited-edition kombucha. It literally encompasses everything merry and bright. Not only is the seasonal brew good for you, but the brand has harmonized notes of ginger, cloves, allspice, and chocolate into their original base formula. The end result? A bottle that combines holiday flavors with your new year, healthier you resolutions. All the more reason to start early, right?

The Health-Ade Holiday Cheers Kombucha is available now nationally for a limited time through the holiday season. Bottles and cases are available at the Health-Ade site, and you can also search the site for a store that carries the brand near you.


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

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The Worst Christmas Candy Canes

Welcome back for another day of #Blogmas. Today IS #Blogmas Day #7. I can’t believe a whole week has passed. I hope you’ve been enjoying Blogmas? Today continues the best/worst of something series (Christmas Edition). If you missed days 1-5 you can click the links here.


Blogmas Links

Blogmas Day 1 Blogmas Day 2 Blogmas Day 3 Blogmas Day 4 Blogmas Day 5 Blogmas Day 6


TROLLI SOUR BRITE HOLIDAY CANDY CANES

TROLLI SOUR BRITE HOLIDAY CANDY CANES

PER 1 PIECE: 50 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 20 mg sodium, 13 g carbs (0 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 0 g protein


WARHEADS SUPER SOUR CANDY CANES

WARHEADS SUPER SOUR CANDY CANES

PER 1 PIECE: 50 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 45 mg sodium, 14 g carbs (0 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 0 g protein

Although both Trolli’s and Warhead’s sour canes have the lowest calorie and sugar contents of their contenders, they are packed with artificial flavors and color dyes. Not that this is too shocking, considering each varieties’ neon stripes.


HERSHEY’S CHOCOLATE MINT CANES

HERSHEYS CHOCOLATE MINT CANES

PER 1 PIECE: 60 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 10 mg sodium, 15 g carbs (0 g fiber, 11 g sugar), 0 g protein

Don’t be fooled by this cane’s name–mint and chocolate aren’t in their list of ingredients. Fake flavors along with added sugars, 11 grams of sugar and a slew of artificial colors are what give this one their superficial appeal.


JELLY BELLY GOURMET CANDY CANES

JELLY BELLY GOURMET CANDY CANES

PER 1 PIECE: 60 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 0 mg sodium, 14 g carbs (0 g fiber, 11 g sugar), 0 g protein

These Jelly Bean “Gourmet” Candy Canes come in three fruity flavors: watermelon, tutti-fruitti and blueberry. And just like the jellies, they’re artificially flavored sugar with crunch instead of chew.


WELCH’S CANDY CANES

WELCHS CANDY CANES

PER 1 PIECE: 60 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 0 mg sodium, 15 g carbs (0 g fiber, 12 g sugar), 0 g protein

While Welch’s 100% Grape Juice may be made from the real thing (aka Concord grapes), their concord grape flavored candy canes are not. And the same goes for the raspberry and white grape peach flavors. With 12 grams of sugar and a laundry list of manmade chemicals, these candy canes are almost the worst.


 THE #1 WORST CHRISTMAS CANDY CANE IS… FANCY PICKLE CANDY CANES

 

PER 40 G: 75 calories, 0 g fat, 15 g sugar (all other nutritionals unavailable)

Apparently, Pickle Candy Canes is a thing and with 75 calories and 15 grams of sugar per cane, these are your worst option. However, I’m guessing this wasn’t your first Christmas candy choice anyways.


 Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

Your Christmas Body

Today is #Blogmas day 4. I can’t believe three other days have passed already. I guess the sayings are true #1 Time flies when you’re having fun and #2 The older you get the faster time flies by. To catch up on Days 1-3 of #blogmas the links will be provided in the Final Thoughts Section at the end of today’s post.

Giving into cravings—and then subsequently dozing off in front of the tree with your top button unfastened—is what the holidays are all about. But after the big meal enters your stomach, the situation inside is anything but serene. In fact, your entire body goes into overdrive the second you smell the holiday spread.


When You Walk Into the Kitchen

 

The second you walk into the kitchen and get a whiff of the turkey, ham and other holiday fares, gastric fluids and other enzymes needed for digestion begin to secrete inside the stomach, priming the digestive system for the meal ahead.


After the First Appetizer

 

Once you start chewing the first bite of food, the stomach immediately begins to expand because it knows more food is on the way that will need to be digested. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract also perks up a bit because it knows more food is on the way. This prompts more digestive enzymes to release from the stomach, pancreas and the intestine. Insulin, the hormone that helps glucose move from the blood into the cells, is also released when you begin to nosh and sugar from the food enters the bloodstream. This subsequently triggers a release of the hormone, leptin, which helps the brain register that we’re eating, and allows for more insulin secretion.


Five Minutes Into the Meal

 

Once you start digging into carb and sugar-laden dishes like mashed potatoes and stuffing, your body releases serotonin, the feel-good hormone. Enjoy the carb-o-bliss—only a few more days till your New year’s resolutions.


Ten Minutes Into the Meal

 

The serotonin then activates the reward system in the brain which tells you, ‘This tastes awesome, I’d like some more’ when you eat something delicious. This is why it’s so hard to say no to seconds or cheat meals.


Twenty Minutes Into the Meal

 

When you start feeling full, sensory nerves in the stomach and appetite controlling hormones like ghrelin activate the satiety centers of the brain, telling you you’ve eaten enough. However, those signals are easy to ignore if others around you are still munching away or the spread looks particularly appealing. Plus if you eat super fast your brain may not get the signal that you’re full until you’ve already served yourself seconds.


Five Minutes After Your Last Bite of Dessert

 

After your last bite of pie, the stomach secretes enzymes and acids that help break down your meal into smaller pieces so it can eventually fit into the small intestine. Starchy and water-based foods are then broken down further into liquid, but fatty foods like Grandma’s buttery mashed potatoes, stick around in the stomach because they aren’t able to break down as quickly, causing that uncomfortable, bloated feeling.


Fifteen Minutes After Dessert

 

By now all your food has made its way from the stomach down into the small intestine. Once it’s arrived, it signals the release of enzymes from the pancreas and gallbladder that helps to digest carbs and proteins and break the food down into amino acids and simple sugars to be absorbed into the bloodstream.


Thirty Minutes After Dessert

 

Feeling tired yet? That’s what I thought. While many people get sleepy after eating their Christmas dinner, the turkey is not to blame. There just isn’t enough tryptophan in a standard serving of the meat to have that kind of effect. The fatigue is most likely a result of your stuffed stomach. Blood rushes out of the extremities into to the abdomen to assist with the digestion process which causes feelings of fatigue.


Two Hours After Dessert

 

Your liver is beginning to break up your dinner into nutrients that your body can absorb and use to stay healthy. At this point, your body will also begin to use the food you’ve eaten for energy. Anything you don’t burn off later tonight will be stored as fat.


Two Days After Christmas

 

Finally, you’ve excreted your holiday meal. Anything that’s been sitting in your stomach giving you a bloated midsection should finally be out of your system! Only 363 days till next Christmas!


Blogmas

If you missed Days 1-3 you can click the links in this section to catch up. If you also have any ideas about what you would like to see from me during #Blogmas please don’t hesitate in giving me your #Blogmas Ideas.

#Blogmas Day 1   #Blogmas Day 2   #Blogmas Day 3


Final Thoughts

I hope you enjoyed today’s post? If you have any questions about today’s post, any past post or questions, in general, please feel free in reaching out. You can ALWAYS find my email in the “Thank You” section and you can also ALWAYS find all of my social media links in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.

If you or someone you may know is looking for one on one coaching or just looking for advice on how to jump-start a healthy lifestyle or how to stay on track during the holidays you can find all of my links which are ALWAYS provided in the “Thank You” section and in the “Where You Can Follow Me” section.


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂

Probiotic That’s Not Yogurt

I know that I said yesterday that I decided to start #blogmas early. As I was figuring out what to write today I came across this post that I had saved. I hope you enjoy today’s post and all links will be provided at the end of every post.

If you missed yesterday’s post about some Amazing Holiday Treats you can Click Here


You’ve probably heard a great deal about the importance of probiotics lately, and how they are key to maintaining good overall health.  explains that a healthy gut leads to improved digestion, better weight management, and a reduced risk of chronic disease.

These days, probiotics are so popular they’re already available in cookies, teas, and yogurts—and now food giant Kellogg’s is getting into the game with another easy way to rev up your good bacteria intake: cold cereal. To that end, they’ve launched a new wellness brand, HI! Happy Inside, which aims to bring the power of probiotics to your daily breakfast in three different flavors (coconut crunch, blueberry, and strawberry).

The selling point here is that the cereal improves the benefits of probiotics by combining them with two other big digestion players, prebiotics and fiber. Each of the three flavors offers one billion CFU probiotics, 2.5 grams of prebiotics, and nine grams of fiber.


Prebiotics vs. Probiotics What’s the Difference?

If you are wondering what the difference is between probiotics and prebiotics, you’re not the only one. Probiotics are live bacteria we eat to promote a healthy gut microbiome, whereas prebiotics is a type of fiber that feeds the bacteria living in our gut.


Be Mindful of The Prebiotic and Probiotic Sources

It’s worth noting that not all probiotics are created equal. It is important to consider the type of strain added to a product because different strains promote different health outcomes. It is ideal to have at least 1 billion CFU per serving, which is usually why companies use a mix of strains.

And just like with probiotics, it’s important to be aware of the prebiotics used in the products you consume as well. The prebiotic used in Hi! Happy Inside cereal is inulin, which comes from chicory root. This is a very common source of prebiotics and can promote gut health. However, some people do experience stomach upset, loose stools, and cramping when they take too much inulin.


A Good Source of Fiber

Fiber is also a good component of gut health,  four grams of fiber per serving is usually recommended. Given that this cereal is made mostly with whole grains and contains nine grams of fiber per serving, it can be helpful in reaching your daily fiber goals, as women need approximately 25 grams per day and men need 37.


What About Sugar?

But even though this cereal can boost your prebiotic, probiotic, and fiber intake, Davidson says it’s important to keep in mind that each serving contains 9 grams of sugar. That comes from a mix of natural sources (milk, yogurt, and berries) and added sugar in the form of cane syrup, cane sugar, and regular table sugar. The fiber in this cereal will help to slow down the absorption of sugar, meaning it won’t have as big of an effect on your blood sugar levels overall.

SHOP HI! HAPPY INSIDE CEREALS NOW ON AMAZON


Thank You!

I do hope you stick around as I put out different types of content I try to post educational, Informative things that everyone can learn from. I am learning what people like to read and what people don’t. The one thing you will get from me Is honesty. If I post something It’s because I believe In It no matter If It’s a beauty review, recipe post, or just me posting a random post.

If you are a company or a person who would like to reach out so we can work together you can reach me here. Leighlei2009@gmail.com

I just want to say Thank you to all of those who read, view, like, comment, and subscribed to my blog It means the world to me ❤️️

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

➡️Where you can follow me⬅️

Check me out on Medium:

https://medium.com/@AmandaExplains

Poshmark: AmandaLei

Pinterest: Amanda Explains It

Steller: AmandaLei

Instagram: Amanda Explains It

Twitter: Amanda Explains It

Snapchat: amandaleilei (CoffeeandGlutenFree)

NO SERIOUSLY FOLLOW ME 🙂